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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
18-Oct-2006

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Contact: Jim Sliwa
jsliwa@asmusa.org
202-942-9297
American Society for Microbiology
@ASMnewsroom

New book uses ABCs to teach children microbiology

A new children's book from ASM Press uses the familiar genre of the ABC book to introduce readers to the not-so-familiar world of microbes. The Invisible ABCs will delight readers of all ages with its colorful presentation and spectacular selection of illustrations. Intended for school-age children and younger, this unique new book will stimulate parents, teachers, librarians, and even older students to discover the fascinating world of microorganisms.

"We are immersed in microbes. They live in our bodies, in our food, and in everything that surrounds us; we cannot live without them. The Invisible ABCs presents answers to questions that we all have an interest in, such as 'Why can cows use grass for food but humans can't?' and 'Why do we get gas after we eat beans?'" says author Rodney Anderson, a microbiologist and professor at Ohio Northern University, who presents photos he has collected of microorganisms shaped like letters of the alphabet to illustrate the significant role microbes play in our daily lives.

This intriguing book contains a glossary of important terms, as well as endpapers illustrating the relative size of organisms from viruses to whales. Age-appropriate vocabulary and examples are used to communicate important scientific principles and concepts throughout the vibrant pages of The Invisible ABCs. A companion website provides deeper understanding for those who seek to learn more about microorganisms.

The Invisible ABCs has a list price of $19.95 and can be purchased through ASM Press online at http://estore.asm.org or through other online retailers.

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ASM Press is the book publishing arm of the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), the oldest and largest single life science membership organization in the world. The ASM's mission is to promote research in the microbiological sciences and to assist communication between scientists, policy makers, and the public to improve health and foster economic well-being.



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