Public Release:  American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine investigates strategies for controlling heart disease

Second issue looks at the influence health care workers have in encouraging change

SAGE Publications

An estimated 75% of Americans seek medical advice from their doctors each year, confirming that health care workers wield significant influence over their patients' lifestyle choices. Unfortunately, physicians tend to underestimate their role as health counselors and don't always suggest controlling heart disease risk factors, such as smoking, high cholesterol and blood pressure, obesity, and inactivity.

The physician's important role in recommending lifestyle changes in addition to medical interventions is thoroughly explored in the headline article of the second issue of the new American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine (AJLM) published by SAGE. The article is co-written by journal Editor-In-Chief James M. Rippe, MD, along with Theodore J. Angelopoulos, PhD, MPH, and Linda Zukley, MA, RN.

"Lifestyle interventions are highly effective at lowering risk for heart disease," write the authors. "The key concept is for health care workers to make a true commitment to learning how to incorporate these measures as a part of clinical practice to bring this valuable information to their patients."

Encouraging health care workers to influence their heart patients to control modifiable risk factors, especially since controlling the risks carries virtually no adverse side effects, fits perfectly with the mission of the new American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine of looking at both the medical and the lifestyle aspects of disease management.

The article, "Lifestyle Medicine Strategies for Risk Factor Reduction, Prevention, and Treatment of Coronary Heart Disease: Part II," published in the March/April 2007 issue of AJLM, can be accessed free for a limited time at http://ajl.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/1/2/79. Part I, published in the debut issue of AJLM, looked at coronary heart disease and how lifestyle changes, with proper pharmaceutical therapy, can lower the risks.

###

The American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine (AJLM), a bimonthly, peer-reviewed journal which began publishing in January 2007, focuses on recognizing and addressing the impact that lifestyle decisions have on health, emphasizing the interaction between traditional therapies and lifestyle modalities to achieve superior outcomes in disease treatment. It also provides information about therapies that minimize the extent to which illness impacts lifestyle. For more information, visit http://ajlm.sagepub.com

SAGE Publications is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets. Since 1965, SAGE has helped inform and educate a global community of scholars, practitioners, researchers, and students spanning a wide range of subject areas including business, humanities, social sciences, and science, technology and medicine. A privately owned corporation, SAGE has principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, and Singapore. www.sagepublications.com

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.