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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
10-Sep-2007

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Contact: Sean Wagner
swagner@bos.blackwellpublishing.com
781-388-8550
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Drug-free treatments offer hope for older people in pain

Elderly sufferers of chronic pain often unable to use traditional medication

Pittsburgh, Pa. - September 10, 2007 - Mind-body therapies, which focus on the interactions between the mind, body and behavior, and the ways in which emotional, mental, social and behavioral factors can affect health, may be of particular benefit to elderly chronic pain sufferers. A new study published in Pain Medicine provides a structured review of eight mind-body interventions for older people, including progressive muscle relaxation, meditation, hypnosis, tai chi and yoga.

All eight treatments were found to be feasible for older adults, and no adverse events or safety issues were reported. The article finds evidence that, in particular, progressive muscle relaxation may be effective for older people with osteoarthritis pain, while meditation and tai chi appear to improve function and coping with low back pain and osteoarthritis.

Chronic pain is common among older people. Sufferers are often unable to receive adequate treatment because of limited physician training in pain management for the elderly and the increased likelihood of side effects from pain medication.

"The trials we reviewed indicated that mind-body therapies were especially well suited to the older adult with chronic pain," concludes lead author Natalia E. Morone, M.D., MSc. "This was because of their gentle approach, which made them suitable for even the frail older adult. Additionally, their positive emphasis on self-exploration was a potential remedy for the heavy emotional, psychological and social burden that is a hallmark of chronic pain."

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This study is published in Pain Medicine. Media wishing to receive a PDF of this article please contact medicalnews@bos.blackwellpublishing.net.

Natalia E. Morone, M.D., MSc is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Morone has written extensively on the treatment of chronic pain in older people, and has conducted research on complementary therapies for pain. She can be reached for questions at moronene@upmc.edu.

Pain Medicine is a multi-disciplinary journal dedicated to the pain clinician, teacher and researcher. It is the Official Journal of the American Academy of Pain Medicine and of the Faculty of Pain Medicine of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists. The journal is devoted to the advancement of pain management, education and research. For more information, please visit www.blackwell-synergy.com/loi/pme.



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