Public Release:  Pedophilia patients are found to have deficits in brain activation

Elsevier

Philadelphia, PA, September 20, 2007 - Pedophilia, the sexual attraction of adults to children, is a significant public health concern and it does not respond well to treatment. Additionally, the brain mechanisms underlying pedophilia are not well understood. A new study being published in the September 15th issue of Biological Psychiatry is the first of its kind to use functional brain imaging to describe neural circuits contributing to pedophilia.

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI, Walter and colleagues report that pedophilic patients showed reduced activation of the hypothalamus, a brain region involved in regulating physiologic arousal and hormone release, as compared to healthy individuals when they were viewing sexually arousing pictures of adults. Deficits of activation in the frontal cortex were associated with the extent of pedophilic behavior. In other words, when shown erotic pictures of adults, the brains of the pedophilic patients had reduced reactions in the pleasure center of the brain, indicating an altered sexual interest.

John H. Krystal, M.D., Editor of Biological Psychiatry and affiliated with both Yale University School of Medicine and the VA Connecticut Healthcare System, comments that, "the ability to intervene rationally in this disorder is limited by shortcomings in our understanding of its neurobiology. The findings provide clues to the complexity of this disorder, [and] this deficit may predispose individuals who are vulnerable to pedophilia to seek other forms of stimulation." It is important to acknowledge and consider however, that it is currently unknown "whether this pattern of brain activation is a risk factor for the development of pedophilia or a consequence of their pedophilic sexual experiences," according to Dr. Krystal, and future research will be needed.

One of the study's authors, Georg Northoff, M.D., Ph.D., adds, "[These findings] may open the door for better understanding the neurobiology of this disorder which is of forensic, criminal and public concern. Our results may thus be seen as the first step towards establishing a neurobiology of pedophilia which ultimately may contribute to the development of new and effective means of therapies for this debilitating disorder."

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Notes to Editors:

The article is "Pedophilia Is Linked to Reduced Activation in Hypothalamus and Lateral Prefrontal Cortex During Visual Erotic Stimulation" by Martin Walter, Joachim Witzel, Christine Wiebking, Udo Gubka, Michael Rotte, Kolja Schiltz, Felix Bermpohl, Claus Tempelmann, Bernhard Bogerts, Hans Jochen Heinze, and Georg Northoff. Drs. Walter, Wiebking, Schiltz, Bogerts and Northoff are with the Department of Psychiatry, Otto-von-Guericke University of Magdeburg, Germany, while Drs. Rotte, Tempelmann, and Heinze are with the Department of Neurology. Drs. Witzel and Gubka are affiliated with the State Hospital for Forensic Psychiatry of Saxonia Anhaltina, Germany. Dr. Bermpohl is with the Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy at Charité Medical School, University Medicine Berlin, Germany. The article appears in Biological Psychiatry, Volume 62, Issue 6 (September 15, 2007), published by Elsevier.

Full text of the article mentioned above is available upon request. Contact Jayne M. Dawkins at (215) 239-3674 or ja.dawkins@elsevier.com to obtain a copy or to schedule an interview.

About Biological Psychiatry

This international rapid-publication journal is the official journal of the Society of Biological Psychiatry. It covers a broad range of topics in psychiatric neuroscience and therapeutics. Both basic and clinical contributions are encouraged from all disciplines and research areas relevant to the pathophysiology and treatment of major neuropsychiatric disorders. Full-length and Brief Reports of novel results, Commentaries, Case Studies of unusual significance, and Correspondence and Comments judged to be of high impact to the field are published, particularly those addressing genetic and environmental risk factors, neural circuitry and neurochemistry, and important new therapeutic approaches. Concise Reviews and Editorials that focus on topics of current research and interest are also published rapidly.

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