Public Release:  Percutaneous valve therapy: is it safe and effective?

Cardiovascular Research Foundation

WASHINGTON, DC - October 22, 2007 - Researchers at TCT 2007, the annual scientific symposium of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF), will present new studies evaluating a rapidly advancing field within interventional cardiology: percutaneous procedures to repair and replace defective heart valves.

Percutaneous valve procedures, which are currently approved only in Europe, are under study in the U.S. In particular, researchers are studying the safety and effectiveness of the devices being used and the techniques used to implant them, as well as the profile of patients who should receive them.

Several studies analyzing the safety and efficacy of percutaneous valve therapies will be presented at TCT 2007:

  • High-risk patients receive life-saving valve replacement
    In a study of 85 patients at high-risk for surgery with stenotic aortic valves, scientists led by John Webb, MD, FACP(C) and Sanjeevan Pasupati, MBChB, FRACP of St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada, describe the first-in-man implantations of the transarterial Percutaneous Aortic Valve (PAV). In these patients, transarterial PAV implantation produced clinical improvements that were sustained at 1 year.

  • Aortic valve replacement
    A team led by Susheel Kodali, MD, of Columbia University, New York, NY, reported mid-term results from the U.S. transcather aortic valve replacement experience. Between December 2005 and November 2006, 55 patients were enrolled. The team concluded that in high-surgical-risk patients, percutaneous aortic valve replacement provides sustained symptom improvement for at least 6-12 months. One-year survival (72.8%) was limited primarily by pre-existing conditions unrelated to the valve implant in this high-risk population.

  • Successful left ventricle remodeling with new percutaneous valve device
    Mitral insufficiency (abnormal blood leakage from the left ventricle through the mitral valve into the left atrium), when severe, may lead to progressive left ventricular enlargement and heart failure. Repair of the leaking mitral valve may improve the function of the failing heart (reverse LV remodeling). A device known as the Mitra Clip was found to be effective, demonstrating significant clinical improvements in patients with mitral regurgitation who had Charlotte, NC.

In addition to these presentations, panel discussions were held on Sunday October 21, "Percutaneous Mitral Valve Repair and Replacement," led by Ted Feldman, MD, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine. These panels discussed the various types of and approaches.


For more information or interviews, contact David Harrison at 410-804-1728.

About CRF and TCT

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) in New York City is an independent, non-profit academic institution dedicated to improving the survival and quality of life of patients with cardiovascular disease through research and education. For more than 15 years, CRF has played a major role in realizing dramatic improvements in the lives of patients by establishing the safe use of new technologies and therapies in the subspecialty of interventional cardiology and endovascular medicine.

The Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium, conducted by the Cardiovascular Research Foundation, is a global gathering of physicians, researchers, technologists, and industry colleagues working in the field of interventional vascular medicine. It is the world's largest privately-run medical conference, attended by more than 10,000 participants each year and featuring the video transmission of more than 100 live patient cases from medical centers around the world. Including lectures, discussion panels, and workshops on the latest clinical findings and cutting-edge technologies, TCT educates medical professionals to ensure that the work of physicians and researchers is translated into improved patient care.

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