[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 9-Nov-2007
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Contact: Wendy Isett
wisett@auanet.org
410-689-3789
American Urological Association

AUA releases new guidelines on non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

Lack of data progression indicates strong need for more research

LINTHICUM, MD. The AUA is pleased to announce their new Guideline on the Management of Nonmuscle Invasive Bladder Cancer. Each year, more than 60,000 people are diagnosed with bladder cancer, which has been linked to a number of risk factors, including cigarette smoking and exposure to hazardous chemicals. The AUA originally published its guideline in 1999 and the report issued today is an update to that document.

The Guideline focuses on current treatment impacts on outcomes of interest to the patient, such as efficacy outcomes and occurrence of complications and side effects in treated patients. Unfortunately, new evidence on treatment modalities is scant and advances in treatment and physician education regarding treatment are limited.

The Guideline reviews a number of current treatments, including transurethral resection of bladder tumors (TURBT) and the use of chemotherapeutic agents (such as mitomycin C) and immunotherapeutic agents (such as bacillus Calmette-Guerin) in conjunction with TURBT. The panel also reviewed the efficacy of chemotherapy vs. immunotherapy in treating these non-invasive tumors, and the use of these agents in single induction courses compared to use as maintenance therapies.

The Guideline comes to the following conclusions based on current literature:

Treatment algorithms are available both in the full document and the Executive Summary. However, many accepted studies used to develop these algorithms did not provide stratified outcomes data, and little data were available in regard to progression and survival. As a result, the panel felt the paucity of data needs to be addressed and corrected; the Guideline includes a discussion of future research needs and the optimal reporting of bladder cancer data. Most available studies focus primarily on recurrence and less on progression to muscle invasion – a more important outcome with lethal implications.

“Bladder cancer affects thousands of people each year and as the incidence of the disease rises, it is increasingly important that clinicians better understand how this disease progresses and how to stop it,” said Craig Hall, M.D., chair of the panel that developed the Guideline. “We may know more than ever about the disease’s clinical behavior and molecular biology, but we need a larger body of strong research in order to educate physicians and make treatment recommendations.”

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The Executive Summary of the Guideline is available in the December issue of The Journal of Urology and the full report is available on the AUA web site, www.AUAnet.org.

The panel developing the Guideline was chaired by M. Craig Hall, M.D. and co-chaired by Sam S. Chang, M.D. Other panel members were Guido Dalbagni, M.D., Raj Som Pruthi, M.D., John Derek Seigne, M.B., Eila Curlee Skinner, M.D., J. Stuart Wolf Jr., M.D. and Paul F. Schellhammer, M.D.

About the American Urological Association: Founded in 1902 and headquartered near Baltimore, Maryland, the American Urological Association is the pre-eminent professional organization for urologists, with more than 15,000 members throughout the world. An educational nonprofit organization, the AUA pursues its mission of fostering the highest standards of urologic care by carrying out a wide variety of programs for members and their patients, including UrologyHealth.org, an award-winning on-line patient education resource, and the American Urological Association Foundation, Inc.



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