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Contact: Anthony F. Trioli
A.Trioli@elsevier.com
215-239-3733
Elsevier

Partners can help or hinder attempts at changing diet

Responses to diet changes reflect relationship dynamics, reports study in Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

Philadelphia, 25 March 2008 – For people trying to make a change in their diet, significant others generally play a positive and supportive role, but sometimes respond in negative ways, according to a study in the March/April Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior (http://www.jneb.org/).

Led by Judy Paisley, Ph.D., R.D., of Ryerson University, Toronto, the researchers looked at how significant others responded when their partners attempted to make a dietary change for health reasons. "For most pairs, the significant others' emotional and behavioral responses to the dietary change appeared to reflect the general dynamics of the relationship," says Dr. Paisley.

The researchers conducted interviews with 21 people making dietary changes—most in response to a medical diagnosis—and with their partners or significant others. "By examining the perspectives of significant others, we hoped to deepen understanding of the social nature of dietary change," Dr. Paisley explains.

The partners' emotional responses varied widely: from co-operation and encouragement to skepticism and anger. In most cases, the significant others described themselves as playing a positive, supportive role. Some facilitated the change by joining in the new diet, or by changing their shopping or cooking habits. Others helped by monitoring the dietary change, finding and sharing information, or providing motivation.

These positive roles seemed to reflect the general dynamics of the relationship, according to Dr. Paisley. "Significant others who demonstrated strong support for their partner's dietary change typically described their relationship as very supportive and often saw their direct participation in the change as a natural extension of their relationship."

However, in some cases, the person trying to make a change felt their partner had a negative impact on their efforts—for example, by eating 'forbidden' foods in front of them. In these cases, the significant others did not view their response as negative. In only one case did both partners agree that the significant other played a neutral role.

Most studies of the role of social support on dietary behavior have focused on the perspective of the person attempting to make a change. The researchers hope that their study will aid in developing ways of promoting dietary modifications as a shared activity.

"Although most significant others described their response as co-operative and supportive, the responses varied widely in terms of the impact that their support may have had on changers’ experiences," adds Dr. Paisley. "For example, indirect indications of support like not complaining about dietary changes may have been less meaningful to changers than direct support offered through positive reinforcement and encouragement."

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About the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

The Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior (JNEB) (http://www.jneb.org/), the official journal of the Society for Nutrition Education, is a refereed, scientific periodical that serves as a resource for all professionals with an interest in nutrition education and dietary/physical activity behaviors. The purpose of JNEB is to document and disseminate original research, emerging issues and practices relevant to nutrition education and behavior worldwide.

About the Society for Nutrition Education

The Society for Nutrition Education (SNE) (http://www.sne.org/) represents the unique professional interests of nutrition educators worldwide. SNE is dedicated to promoting healthy, sustainable food choices and has a vision of healthy people in health communities. SNE provides forums for sharing innovative strategies for nutrition education, expressing a range of views on important issues and disseminating research findings. SNE members conduct research in education, behavior and communication; develop and disseminate innovative nutrition education strategies; and communicate information on food, nutrition and health issues to students, professionals, policy makers, targeted audiences and the public.

About Elsevier

Elsevier is a world-leading publisher of scientific, technical and medical information products and services. Working in partnership with the global science and health communities, Elsevier's 7,000 employees in over 70 offices worldwide publish more than 2,000 journals and 1,900 new books per year, in addition to offering a suite of innovative electronic products, such as ScienceDirect (http://www.sciencedirect.com/), MD Consult (http://www.mdconsult.com/), Scopus (http://www.info.scopus.com/), bibliographic databases, and online reference works.

Elsevier (http://www.elsevier.com/) is a global business headquartered in Amsterdam, The Netherlands and has offices worldwide. Elsevier is part of Reed Elsevier Group plc (http://www.reedelsevier.com/), a world-leading publisher and information provider. Operating in the science and medical, legal, education and business-to-business sectors, Reed Elsevier provides high-quality and flexible information solutions to users, with increasing emphasis on the Internet as a means of delivery. Reed Elsevier's ticker symbols are REN (Euronext Amsterdam), REL (London Stock Exchange), RUK and ENL (New York Stock Exchange).



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