[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 21-Apr-2008
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Contact: Charlotte Webber
charlotte.webber@biomedcentral.com
44-020-763-19980
BioMed Central

Teenage suicides: Study advocates greater family support

Teenage suicide is often perceived as the result of rejection of family, significant others and of society. Families affected by teenage suicide often look back for warning signs and clues in order to make sense of the tragedy. With the recent teenage suicides in Bridgend, South Wales, there have been demands for improved suicide prevention strategies. However little attention is paid to those families who have already lost their teenage sons or daughters.

Research published in the open access journal, BMC Psychiatry, has highlighted a key role for general practitioners in organising long-term, individually formulated support schemes for those affected.

A research team from Umeĺ University has already identified the phenomenon of cluster suicides where one suicide appears to have a ‘contagious’ effect triggering further suicidal activities and even suicide among other teenagers in a community. General practitioners were identified as having a key role in providing support for the family and close contacts of victims to potentially prevent further suicides.

Following this initial study, the same group has attempted to investigate in more depth the aftermath of suicide on families.

Based on data from a large project on unnatural teenage deaths in northern Sweden (1981-2000), the team led by Per Lindqvist retrospectively analysed 10 cases. The researchers examined the qualitative aspects of loosing a teenage family member due to suicide, including post-suicidal reactions, impacts on daily living, and the families’ need for support after the event.

At the time of the research, the participants were still struggling to explain why the suicide had occurred. Although most had returned to an ostensibly normal life, they were still profoundly affected by their loss. They highlighted that post-suicide support was often badly timed and insufficient, especially for younger siblings and said they would welcome earlier assistance from friends, family and the clergy.

Lindqvist comments “There is a need for better understanding and treatment schemes for families who have lost a teenage family member in suicide, and especially for the younger siblings who often are forgotten”.

The general practitioner was again identified as a key person in organising a support strategy for the families of suicide victims. This support would not only prevent emotional contagion, but would actively help families in the aftermath of a teenage suicide.

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Notes to Editor:

1. In the aftermath of teenage suicide: A qualitative study of the psychosocial consequences for the surviving family members Per Lindqvist, Lars Johansson and Urban Karlsson BMC Psychiatry (21 April 2008)

Article available at the journal website: http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpsychiatry/

Please name the journal in any story you write. If you are writing for the web, please link to the article. All articles are available free of charge, according to BioMed Central’s open access policy.

Article citation and URL available on request at press@biomedcentral.com

2. The authors’ previous research can be found here: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2296/7/32 Teenage suicide cluster formation and contagion: implications for primary care Johansson L, Lindqvist P, Eriksson A BMC Family Practice 2006, 7:32 (17 May 2006)

3. BMC Psychiatry is an open access journal publishing original peer-reviewed research articles in all aspects of the prevention, diagnosis and management of psychiatric disorders, as well as related molecular genetics, pathophysiology, and epidemiology. BMC Psychiatry (ISSN 1471-244X) is indexed/tracked/covered by PubMed, MEDLINE, CAS, Scopus, EMBASE, Thomson Scientific (ISI) and Google Scholar.

4. BioMed Central (http://www.biomedcentral.com/) is an independent online publishing house committed to providing immediate access without charge to the peer-reviewed biological and medical research it publishes. This commitment is based on the view that open access to research is essential to the rapid and efficient communication of science.



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