[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
4-Aug-2008

[ | E-mail ] Share Share

Contact: Angela Collom
acollom@acponline.org
215-351-2653
American College of Physicians
@ACPinternists

US Preventive Services Task Force updates prostate cancer screening recommendations

Task Force finds no screening benefit for men over 75

PHILADELPHIA, August 5, 2008 - The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), updating its 2002 report, now recommends against routine prostate cancer screening for men over the age of 75. More evidence is needed to determine if men under 75 could benefit from screening.

Previously, the Task Force concluded that there was insufficient scientific evidence to recommend screening for all men, and found inconclusive evidence that early detection improves health outcomes. The updated recommendations appear in the August 5, 2008 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine, the American College of Physicians' flagship journal, and are available online at www.annals.org.

Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in men in the United States, affecting one in six men. Measurement of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in the blood can detect prostate cancer before symptoms develop. Some abnormal PSA levels may require prostate biopsy to see if cancer is actually present.

While the PSA tests are effective for detecting disease, the Task Force found that there is insufficient evidence that they improve long-term health outcomes.

"We carefully reviewed the available evidence to measure the benefits and harms of screening for prostate cancer and could not find adequate proof that early detection leads to fewer men dying of the disease," said Task Force Chair Ned Calonge, M.D., M.P.H., who is also Chief Medical Officer for the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Denver. "At this point, we recommend that men concerned about prostate cancer talk with their health care providers to make a decision based on their individual risk factors and personal preference."

###

Annals of Internal Medicine is one of the five most widely cited peer-reviewed medical journals in the world. The journal has been published for 81 years and accepts only 7 percent of the original research studies submitted for publication. Annals of Internal Medicine is published by the American College of Physicians (http://www.acponline.org) (ACP), the largest medical specialty organization and the second-largest physician group in the United States. ACP members include 126,000 internal medicine physicians (internists), related subspecialists, and medical students. Internists specialize in the prevention, detection, and treatment of illness in adults.



[ Back to EurekAlert! ] [ | E-mail Share Share ]

 


AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.