Public Release:  Newer cardiac imaging machines effective in detecting coronary artery stenosis

LA BioMed researcher authors first multicenter study of noninvasive method to measure narrowing of the heart's arteries

Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed)

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IMAGE: Michael J. Budoff, M.D., Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute author of study on effectiveness of cardiac CT imaging. view more

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TORRANCE (August 25, 2008) - The first multicenter study of the accuracy of some of the latest cardiac imaging technology found it was 99 percent as effective in ruling out obstructive coronary artery stenosis - or narrowing of these arteries - as the more expensive and invasive coronary angiography traditionally used by physicians, according to research published online by the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Matthew J. Budoff, M.D., a principal investigator at the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed), is the lead author of the study conducted at 16 different sites with 230 research volunteers with chest pain but no known coronary artery disease.

"The research found this noninvasive method of cardiac imaging will effectively detect stenosis - a constriction or narrowing - of the coronary arteries which can lead to heart attacks and may require surgery to repair," Dr. Budoff said. "This is good news for patients who, in the past, might have been forced to undergo a more expensive and invasive procedure to determine if they suffered from blockages in the arteries leading to their hearts."

In the study, each of the research volunteers was examined using some of the newer cardiac CT technology - electrocardiographically gated 64-multidetector row coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA). Each volunteer also underwent the more expensive and invasive coronary angiography, which is often called the "gold standard" for evaluating coronary artery stenosis.

The researchers found CCTA provided high diagnostic accuracy for detection of obstructive coronary stenosis at the thresholds of a 50 percent narrowing and at 70 percent stenosis. It also found CCTA was accurate 99 percent of the time in ruling out coronary artery stenosis.

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The study is entitled "Diagnostic Performance of 64-Multidetector Row Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography for Evaluation of Coronary Artery Stenosis in Individuals Without Known Coronary Artery Disease."

It may be viewed on the Journal of the American College of Cardiology website: http://content.onlinejacc.org/ under "Fast Track" study listings. Or a copy may be obtained by calling or emailing Laura Mecoy, 310.546.5860, or Lmecoy@issuesmanagement.com

The study was paid for by GE Healthcare, which manufactures the cardiac CT imaging devices used in the study. Dr. Budoff and Dr. James K. Min, who also participated in the study, are on the Speakers' Bureau for General Electric.

About LA BioMed

Founded 56 years ago, LA BioMed is one of the country's largest not-for-profit independent biomedical research institutes. It conducts biomedical research, trains young scientists and provides community services, including childhood immunization, nutrition assistance and anti-gang violence programs. The institute's researchers conduct studies in such areas as cardio-vascular disease, emerging infections, cancer, diabetes, kidney disease, dermatology, reproductive health, vaccine development, respiratory disorders, inherited illnesses and neonatology.

LA BioMed is an independent institute that is academically affiliated with the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. The institute is located on the campus of Harbor-UCLA Medical Center near Torrance.

It contributes to Los Angeles County's economic viability while inventing the future of health care through its ground-breaking research, its training of the scientists of tomorrow and its service to the local community. Please visit our website at www.LABioMed.org

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