[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 19-Sep-2008
[ | E-mail Share Share ]

Contact: Patrick A. Berzinski
pberzins@stevens.edu
201-216-5687
Stevens Institute of Technology

National survey finds information tech and business alignment a struggle for American companies

Lack of alignment translates into lower revenue

HOBOKEN, N.J. - The Society for Information Management (SIM) has released an important part of its annual survey results, reporting that IT executives continue to identify lack of IT and business alignment as the top concern for companies. Other top concerns include a deficiency in business skills training for IT professionals, and the need for greater emphasis on strategic planning in IT. HR considerations were among one-third of the top ten concerns.

"In today's ever-evolving global economy, the question no longer is how can IT be better aligned with business, but how can business and technology be better aligned with each other," said Jerry Luftman, vice president of academic community affairs for SIM and associate dean and distinguished professor at Stevens Institute of Technology. "This is a crucial question that businesses need to answer because good alignment translates into increased innovation and revenue."

IT and Business Alignment

Luftman says that businesses with good IT alignment, also referred to as "mature alignment," share common traits. They all have effective:

Talent Worries

But before business and IT can achieve mature alignment, Luftman says academia and business must ensure that IT professionals have adequate training. "To succeed in business, knowing the ins-and-outs of technology is only a piece of the puzzle," says Luftman. "We need our universities and companies to do a better job of equipping our next generation of IT professionals with a more a skill set that includes training in communications (writing, presenting, marketing, negotiating), business, management, and industry."

Strategic Planning and the Economy

While the released part of the survey highlighted concerns, it also showed some financial optimism within IT organizations. Only 25 percent of the organizations said that 2009 budgets would decrease in 2008, while only 15 percent said that staffing would be reduced. Luftman doesn't attribute this just to an economic turnaround. Instead, he says, "companies are being much smarter about handling economic downturns. By being proactive and planning ahead, they place themselves at a competitive advantage."

Top 10 IT Management Concerns

Following is SIM's full list of CIOs' top ten IT management concerns in 2008:

  1. IT and business alignment
  2. Build business skills in IT
  3. IT strategic planning
  4. Attracting new IT professionals
  5. Making better use of information
  6. Managing change
  7. Reducing the cost of doing business
  8. Improving IT quality*
  9. Retaining IT professionals*
  10. Security and privacy*

(*tied)

###
NOTE: Professor Luftman is available this week and next to discuss the survey's findings and his recommendations. To schedule an interview, please contact Jeff Falk at (952) 346-6270 or jfalk@webershandwick.com

About the Society for Information Management

Established in 1968 and based in Chicago, Ill., the Society for Information Management (SIM) is the premier network for IT leaders comprised of more than 3,600 members including CIOs, CTOs, senior IT executives, prominent academicians, and foremost consultants. SIM is a community of thought leaders who share experiences, apply rich intellectual capital, and who explore future IT direction. Through its 31 regional Chapters, SIM provides resources and programs inspired by IT leaders for IT leaders that enable CIOs to further develop their leadership capabilities and those of the emerging leaders in their organizations. SIM provides the collective voice to advocate policy and legislation on behalf of the IT profession. On the Web: http://www.simnet.org/.

About Stevens Institute of Technology

Founded in 1870, Stevens Institute of Technology is one of the leading technological universities in the world dedicated to learning and research. Through its broad-based curricula, nurturing of creative inventiveness, and cross disciplinary research, the Institute is at the forefront of global challenges in engineering, science, and technology management. Partnerships and collaboration between, and among, business, industry, government and other universities contribute to the enriched environment of the Institute. A new model for technology commercialization in academe, known as Technogenesis®, involves external partners in launching business enterprises to create broad opportunities and shared value. Stevens offers baccalaureates, master's and doctoral degrees in engineering, science, computer science and management, in addition to a baccalaureate degree in the humanities and liberal arts, and in business and technology. The university has a total enrollment of 2,040 undergraduate and 3,085 graduate students, and a worldwide online enrollment of 2,250, with about 250 full-time faculty. Stevens' graduate programs have attracted international participation from China, India, Southeast Asia, Europe and Latin America. Additional information may be obtained from its web page at www.stevens.edu.

For the latest news about Stevens, please visit www.StevensNewsService.com.



[ Back to EurekAlert! ] [ | E-mail Share Share ]

 


AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.