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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
3-Oct-2008

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Contact: Jeffrey Beeson
BeesonJ@missouri.edu
573-882-9144
University of Missouri-Columbia
@mizzounews

Viewers will receive greatest benefit in presidential town hall debate

Next Tuesday night, Senators John McCain and Barack Obama will meet on the debate stage for their second presidential debate, but this time they will not be alone. The candidates will be joined by dozens of "undecided" citizens eager to interrogate the two presidential hopefuls. While political strategists and media pundits are busy pondering which candidate is best served by such encounters, Mitchell McKinney, a University of Missouri associate professor of communication and presidential debate expert, says that citizens at home viewing the debate may be the greatest beneficiaries.

McKinney, an international expert on presidential debates, has analyzed the role and effects of citizens questioning candidates during debates.

His research reveals:

McKinney also has found that candidate forums and debates that involve innovations, such as the use of video segments and Internet questions, are particularly effective in reaching younger voters.

McKinney has conducted extensive research of various candidates' debate performances, including this year's presidential and vice presidential debates and numerous Democratic and Republican primary debates that featured Barack Obama and John McCain.

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In 1992, McKinney consulted with the Commission on Presidential Debates, advising the Commission on how debates could be structured in order to better educate citizens on significant campaign issues. The co-author of The 1992 Presidential Debates in Focus, he has co-authored and edited four other books and numerous research articles on presidential debates. Most recently, he advised the presidential debate committee of South Korea as Seoul officials planned their 2002 televised presidential debates.



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