[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 8-Dec-2008
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Contact: Jennifer Bass
jbass@indiana.edu
812-855-7686
Indiana University

Contraceptive methods shape women's sexual pleasure and satisfaction

New data from The Kinsey Institute at Indiana University demonstrate that many women think condoms undermine sexual pleasure, but those who use both hormonal contraception and condoms report higher overall sexual satisfaction.

The study authors suggest that this inconsistency reflects how women think about their contraceptive method when asked questions about two different aspects of sexuality -- sexual enjoyment and overall sexual satisfaction.

When considering overall sexual satisfaction, which goes beyond the immediate sexual moment and includes factors such as sexual self-esteem and relationship satisfaction, women who used both condoms and hormonal methods reported the highest levels of sexual satisfaction.

On the other hand, when asked directly about the effect of contraceptive methods on sexual enjoyment, women who used condoms, either alone or with hormonal methods, were far more likely to report decreased pleasure, suggesting women feel condoms make sex less pleasurable. Those who used only hormonal methods, such as the birth control pill, were unlikely to associate their method with decreased sexual pleasure.

The study, published in November's issue of Sexual Health, begins to answer questions about contraceptive methods and women's sexuality -- an area largely ignored by researchers.

"The public health community has paid little attention to women's sexual experiences with contraceptive methods, especially condoms," said Stephaine Sanders, associate director of The Kinsey Institute and a co-author of the study. "If women think condoms detract from sexual pleasure, they may be less inclined to use them consistently."

Findings include:

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Authors of the study include lead author Jenny Higgins, Princeton University; Susie Hoffman, Columbia University; and Cynthia Graham, University of Oxford.

For more information, please contact Jennifer Bass at The Kinsey Institute, 812-855-7986 and jbass@indiana.edu, or study author Jenny Higgins, jennyh@princeton.edu.

For a copy of the study, please visit http://www.indiana.edu/~iunews/Higgins.pdf.



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