[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 15-Feb-2009
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Contact: Lauren Harris
lharris@spectrumscience.com
214-773-6644
Spectrum

Beauty and grooming science evolves

P&G Beauty & Grooming scientists present latest findings from hair, skin, color and shaving at AAAS Annual Meeting

Chicago, IL (February 15, 2009)—P&G Beauty & Grooming scientists are presenting research at the AAAS Annual Meeting (Chicago, Feb. 12-16) that offers evidence of science's role in evolving beauty and grooming product efficacy. This year's meeting theme observes the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin's birth, affording a unique perspective for examining the company's use of advanced science and technology to help individuals feel and look their best. Five studies--with subjects ranging from color optics to skin aging genomics to razor engineering--will be on display.

"The way people have managed their personal beauty and grooming routines continues to evolve, and scientists at P&G Beauty & Grooming are constantly driven to apply science insights to bring more advanced products to the market," said Steve Shiel, PhD, Associate Director, P&G Beauty & Grooming Science. "The AAAS Annual Meeting provides a premier forum for us to share insights with science peers and hear feedback that can lead to new hypothesis."

The following research summaries provide illustrations of the rigor brought to bear on product innovation at P&G Beauty & Grooming (Corresponding researchers are on-site and available for interview).

Color Science

More than Meets the Eye: The Science of Unique Skin Color and its Interaction with Cosmetic Foundation, Presented by Karen Kalla

The optics of human skin are well understood, including how the skin's chromophore layers (melanin, hemoglobin, and collagen) generate reflectance in specific regions of the visible spectrum. However, how these phenomenon vary across populations, impact skin defects (e.g. under eye circles, age spots) and can be predicted through light absorption and scattering principles (Kubelka Munk theory) are less well known. This poster outlines our combined understanding of these areas, and sets forth the scientific process involved in applying this knowledge to create better color foundation formulations to eliminate the problems of pasty or orange look on skin.

Genomics of Skin Aging

Genomic Analysis of the Anti-oxidant Capacity of Aging Skin, Presented by Rosemarie Osborne, PhD

Studies have established that environmental factors, such as UV light, trigger skin damage and photo-aging. And while the benefits of antioxidants in offsetting this damage have been documented, thorough understanding of skin's anti-oxidant response element (ARE) on a genomic level are key to the next generation of targeted prevention and reversal strategies. To uncover these insights, researchers analyzed gene expression patterns in sun-exposed and sun-protected old and young skin. The study results detail the genomic patterns found, including a pathway which found older, exposed skin having a dysregulated expression of ARE-related proteins, thus resulting in reduced defenses against oxidative damage, as compared to younger skin.

Stratum Corneum Lipid Metabolism Pathways Associated with Intrinsic and Extrinsic Aging, Presented by Rosemarie Osborne, PhD

The same genomic study described above found new insights on the stratum corneum, the skin's barrier layer responsible for protecting against environmental assaults. Through a separate analysis, P&G Beauty & Grooming researchers gleaned vital genomic understandings of the respective roles of intrinsic and extrinsic aging in affecting the stratum corneum's ability to perform its core function. The same study analyzed this affect while adding the variable of a topical cosmetic compound, using human skin equivalents. The results demonstrated that the compound increased the expression of genes involved in lipid biosynthesis and metabolism of the stratum corneum, leading to new appreciation of its potential in improving barrier maintenance and repair.

Hair Science

Liquid Crystals for Surface Modifications of Colored Hair, Presented by Steve Shiel, PhD

Conventional oxidative hair color processes, such as bleaching, change the structure of hair fibers, removing more than 70 percent of the natural, hydrophobic protective layer after even a single coloring. This structural change inhibits hair's interaction with traditional, hydrophobic conditioning ingredients, such as dimethicone, leaving bleached hair in an unprotected state. To address this damage, P&G Beauty & Grooming scientists studied the effect of liquid crystal technology. Liquid crystals were found to significantly increase the hydrophobicity of the hair surface, enabling bleached hair to be conditioned with dimethicone. A description of this proprietary technology and its benefits to hair structure is presented.

Grooming Science

Innovations in Modern Blade and Razor Technology, Presented by Pamela Zupkosky

The modern five-blade razor is the product of years of research and technological advances. A five-blade razor is not a new idea, but it has taken almost 90 years to perfect the technology. Like all multi-blade razors, the five-blade razor improves the closeness of the shave through the "hysteresis effect," which results from a slight hair extension out of the follicle as the first blade engages and from the hair being cut further down the hair shaft by the subsequent blades. But the five-blade razor goes far beyond other multi-blade razors. P&G Beauty & Grooming scientists had to carefully optimize the inter-blade span and blade edge technology to ensure that closeness is complemented with excellent shaving comfort and rinsing properties.

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On-Site Details:

Presenters will be at their posters for commentary on Sunday, February 15th from 1:00-5:00 pm in the Hyatt Regency Chicago, Riverside Hall.

Contacts: Lauren Harris
(202) 955-6222, or on-site: (214) 773-6644
lharris@spectrumscience.com

Juhi Kunde
(202) 955-6222
jkunde@spectrumscience.com

About P&G Beauty & Grooming

P&G Beauty & Grooming has more than 1,800 scientists and technical employees working at 9 global technical centers with an unparalleled commitment to technology development. Company scientific efforts have resulted in over 10,000 active beauty and grooming patents. This allows P&G to develop products uniquely suited for different types of hair and skin, and tailored to different cultures and climates.

P&G Beauty & Grooming products help make beauty dreams real for women worldwide and help men look, feel and be their best every day. With more than 100 brands available in nearly 130 countries, P&G's beauty and grooming products delivered sales of nearly $28 billion in fiscal year 2007/08 , making it one of the world's largest beauty and grooming companies. P&G Beauty & Grooming offers trusted brands with leading technology to meet the full complement of beauty and grooming needs, including Pantene®, Olay®, Head & Shoulders®, Max Factor®, Cover Girl®, DDF®, Frederic Fekkai®, Wellaflex®, Rejoice®, Sebastian Professional®, Herbal Essences®, Koleston®, Clairol Professional®, Nice 'n Easy®, Venus®, Gillette®, SK-II®, Wella Professionals®, Braun® and a leading Prestige Fragrance division that spans from point of market entry consumers to high end luxury with global brands such as Hugo Boss®, Lacoste®, and Christina Aguilera®. (NYSE: PG)

Please visit www.pgbeautyscience.com for the latest news and in-depth information about P&G Beauty & Grooming and its scientific developments.



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