[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 17-Sep-2009
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Contact: Graeme Baldwin
graeme.baldwin@biomedcentral.com
44-020-319-22165
BioMed Central

Face off

Misunderstood expressions facilitate adolescent aggression

Juvenile delinquency may be a result of misunderstood social cues. Research published in BioMed Central's open access journal Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health shows that male juvenile delinquents frequently misinterpret facial expressions of disgust as anger, providing a possible cause for their aggressive behaviour.

Wataru Sato from Kyoto University and Naomi Matsuura from the Tokyo University of Social Welfare worked with a team of researchers to compare the ability of 24 male adolescent delinquents incarcerated in Japan with that of their peers without conduct problems to recognize emotional states. The adolescents were shown 48 photographs of faces expressing 6 basic emotions and were asked to match each face with an emotion. They found that delinquents were more likely than their peers to misinterpret facial expressions of disgust as anger.

According to Sato, " The present study provides the first clear evidence that delinquents have a bias toward the misrecognition of others' disgusted expressions as anger." When taken in social context, this misinterpretation of disgust as anger could result in delinquents experiencing a more intense emotional response than necessary and consequently cause the misinterpretation of situations as hostile. "This bias towards misrecognizing other emotions as anger is particularly significant because anger appears to play an important role in delinquency", adds the author. Previous studies have found that juvenile delinquents often have short tempers and experience more intense anger than other children.

The researchers conclude, "Taken together the data suggest that delinquents might be projecting their own heightened angry emotions onto others when they misperceive others' negative, but not hostile, emotional states as anger."

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Notes to Editors

1. Misrecognition of facial expressions in delinquents
Wataru Sato, Shota Uono, Naomi Matsuura and Motomi Toichi
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health (in press)

During embargo, article available here: http://www.capmh.com/imedia/7280831112662346_article.pdf?random=831227

After the embargo, article available at the journal website: http://www.capmh.com/

Please name the journal in any story you write. If you are writing for the web, please link to the article. All articles are available free of charge, according to BioMed Central's open access policy.

Article citation and URL available on request at press@biomedcentral.com on the day of publication.

2. Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health is an international platform for rapid and comprehensive scientific communication on child and adolescent mental health across different cultural backgrounds.

3. BioMed Central (http://www.biomedcentral.com/) is an STM (Science, Technology and Medicine) publisher which has pioneered the open access publishing model. All peer-reviewed research articles published by BioMed Central are made immediately and freely accessible online, and are licensed to allow redistribution and reuse. BioMed Central is part of Springer Science+Business Media, a leading global publisher in the STM sector.



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