[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 17-Sep-2009
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Contact: Marie Jennings
mfj@stowers.org
816-926-4015
Stowers Institute for Medical Research

Baumann Lab demonstrates role of protein in distinguishing chromosome ends from DNA breaks

The Stowers Institute's Baumann Lab has demonstrated how human cells protect chromosome ends from misguided repairs that can lead to cancer. The work, published in The EMBO Journal, a publication of the European Molecular Biology Organization, follows the team's 2007 in vitro demonstration of the role of the hRAP1 protein in preventing chromosome ends from being fused to new DNA breaks.

Chromosomes are linear. Their ends (called telomeres) should look like DNA breaks to the proteins that repair them. But somehow, cells are able to distinguish chromosome ends from DNA breaks. In this work, the team demonstrated that the human RAP1 protein plays a key role in preventing chromosome ends from being fused to new DNA breaks. Chromosome end fusions result in genomic instability, which can cause cancer. These findings suggest that RAP1 plays a critical role in cancer prevention in humans.

"Protecting naturally occurring chromosome ends from erosion and fusions may increase longevity and reduce cancer risk," said Jay Sarthy, formerly a graduate student in the Baumann Lab and lead author on the paper. "A protein that protects chromosome ends may provide an attractive target for drugs that can help to stave off aging and cancer."

"Our finding has paved the way to investigate the mechanism by which hRAP1 protects chromosome ends from undergoing fusions," said Peter Baumann, Ph.D., Associate Investigator and senior author on the publication. "This research contributes to our understanding of chromosome stability and, thereby, tumor suppression and cancer. If partial loss of hRAP1 function causes chromosomal instability, as suggested by our current work, then mutations in RAP1 may be linked to a predisposition for cancer."

Identifying hRAP1 as a critical protector of chromosome ends was an important step in understanding how telomeres are protected from DNA repair. The Baumann Lab will move forward in their efforts to understand what hRAP1 does to protect telomeres from repair the proteins with which it interacts, and how it inactivates DNA repair specifically at chromosome ends.

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Additional contributing authors from the Stowers Institute include Nancy Bae, Ph.D., formerly a Postdoctoral Research Associate; and Jonathan Scrafford, formerly a Summer Scholar.

Dr. Baumann is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Early Career Scientist. He is also an Associate Professor in the Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology at The University of Kansas School of Medicine. Learn more about his work at www.stowers.org/labs/BaumannLab.asp.

About the Stowers Institute

Housed in a 600,000 square-foot state-of-the-art facility on a 10-acre campus in the heart of Kansas City, Missouri, the Stowers Institute for Medical Research conducts basic research on fundamental processes of cellular life. Through its commitment to collaborative research and the use of cutting-edge technology, the Institute seeks more effective means of preventing, treating, and curing disease. Jim and Virginia Stowers endowed the Institute with gifts totaling $2 billion. The endowment resides in a large cash reserve and in substantial ownership of American Century Investments, a privately held mutual fund company that represents exceptional value for the Institute's future.



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