[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 28-Oct-2009
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Contact: David Sampson
david.sampson@cancer.org
American Cancer Society

American Cancer Society calls for new strategies to monitor exposure to environmental carcinogens

ATLANTA—October 28, 2009—A new report from an American Cancer Society (ACS) scientific advisory subcommittee on cancer and the environment says exposure to carcinogens should be minimized or eliminated whenever feasible, and calls for new strategies to more effectively and efficiently screen the large number of chemicals to which the public is exposed. The report was created as part of an initiative to address ongoing and emerging issues related to environmental pollutants and cancer, and to articulate the American Cancer Society's principles, objectives, and potential roles regarding environmental pollution and cancer prevention.

"The issue of environmental pollutants in air, water, food, and consumer products is one that generates significant public concern and uncertainty," said Jonathan Samet, M.D., chairman of the Department of Preventive Medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, and co-chair of the committee that authored the report. "With this report, we felt it was important to put environmental pollutants into the broader context of cancer prevention, which includes efforts to reduce tobacco use, improve nutrition, increase physical activity, maintain a healthy body weight, and provide vaccinations against the infections that cause cancer."

"Exposure levels to environmental pollution to the general public are typically far lower than the levels associated with the proven cancer risks shown in occupational or other settings," said Elizabeth "Terry" T.H. Fontham, M.P.H., Dr.P.H., national volunteer president of the American Cancer Society and co-chair of the committee. "Nevertheless, these low-level exposures do cause us concern because of the multiplicity of substances, the fact that many exposures are out of the public's control, and the potential that even low-level exposures contribute to the cancer burden when large numbers of people are exposed."

The committee's report notes that the scientific issues regarding environmental exposure are quite complex, as is the growing landscape of technologies used to evaluate chemical carcinogenicity. Despite the value of the current systems for identifying and classifying evidence for carcinogenicity, the report says there are major constraints in implementing them due to both the limited resources allocated to operate these systems and the scientific complexity of the issues themselves.

The position statement on cancer prevention also says:

"In developing this new initiative to increase understanding of how exposures to environmental pollutants may affect the risk of various cancers, the ACS will build on its long-term commitment to scientifically based prevention," says the report, adding that "the ACS is committed to exploring these issues further to identify ways in which it can contribute most effectively."

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Article: "American Cancer Society Perspectives on Environmental Factors and Cancer," Elizabeth T. H. Fontham, DrPH; Michael J. Thun, MD; Elizabeth Ward, PhD; Alan J. Balch, PhD; John Oliver L. Delancey, MPH; Jonathan M. Samet, MD; on behalf of the ACS Cancer and the Environment Subcommittee, CA Cancer J Clin Published Online: October 28, 2009 (doi:10.3322/caac.20041); Print Issue Date: November/December 2009.

About the American Cancer Society

The American Cancer Society combines an unyielding passion with nearly a century of experience to save lives and end suffering from cancer. As a global grassroots force of more than three million volunteers, we fight for every birthday threatened by every cancer in every community. We save lives by helping people stay well by preventing cancer or detecting it early; helping people get well by being there for them during and after a cancer diagnosis; by finding cures through investment in groundbreaking discovery; and by fighting back by rallying lawmakers to pass laws to defeat cancer and by rallying communities worldwide to join the fight. As the nation's largest non-governmental investor in cancer research, contributing about $3.4 billion, we turn what we know about cancer into what we do. As a result, more than 11 million people in America who have had cancer and countless more who have avoided it will be celebrating birthdays this year. To learn more about us or to get help, call us any time, day or night, at 1-800-227-2345 or visit cancer.org.



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