Public Release:  Switching immunosuppressants reduces cancer risk in kidney

Treatment reduces risk, but nearly half of patients stop treatment due to side effects

American Society of Nephrology

IMAGE

IMAGE: This is Graeme Russ, M.D., from the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Australia. view more

Credit: American Society of Nephrology

Switching to a newer type of immunosuppressant drug may reduce the high rate of skin cancer after kidney transplantation, according to research being presented at the American Society of Nephrology's 42nd Annual Meeting and Scientific Exposition in San Diego, CA.

"In spite of the life-saving nature of organ transplantation, the need for transplant recipients to continue treatment with drugs that suppress the immune system to prevent rejection of the organ is associated with a number of side effects, one of which is the development of cancer," said lead researcher Graeme Russ, MD (The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Australia). "So the search for an immunosuppressive drug which prevents rejection effectively but is associated with lower rates of cancer will be of significant advantage to transplant recipients."

The study included 86 kidney transplant patients who previously had skin cancer (other than melanoma)--placing them at particularly high risk of new skin cancers. In Australia, skin cancer is the most common type of cancer occurring post-transplant.

One group of patients remained on standard immunosuppressant drug treatment. The other group was switched to treatment with sirolimus--one of a newer class of immunosuppressants called mTOR inhibitors. "Previous studies have suggested that mTOR inhibitors are associated with less cancer than other commonly used agents," according to Russ.

Patients switched to sirolimus had a significantly lower rate of new skin cancers. Overall, new skin cancers developed in 56 percent of patients in the sirolimus group, compared to 81 percent of those who remained on the standard immunosuppressant. Most of the difference reflected a lower rate of one type of cancer, called squamous cell carcinoma.

Nearly half of patients stopped taking sirolimus because of side effects. "In spite of this large dropout rate there was a significantly lower rate of skin cancer development in the sirolimus group," said Russ. Switching to sirolimus did not increase the risk of rejection of the transplanted kidney.

Switching immunosuppressants may offer a new option to reduce the high risk of skin cancer for transplant recipients, the researchers believe. Russ added, "This is the first randomized controlled trial to address whether patients treated with mTOR inhibitors after renal transplantation have less skin cancer."

###

The study was supported by Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, the manufacturer of sirolimus. Dr. Russ has received lecture fees and honoraria from Wyeth; honoraria and advisory board fees from Novartis; honoraria and advisory fees from Bristol-Meyers Squibb; and lecture fees from Astellas.

EDITOR: The study abstract, "Kidney Transplant Recipients at High Risk for Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer (NMSC) May Benefit from Conversion to Sirolimus versus Continuation of Calcineurin Inhibitors," (SA-FC350) will be presented as part of a Free Communication Session during the American Society of Nephrology's 42nd Annual Meeting and Scientific Exposition on Oct. 31 at 4:00 pm in Room 5 of the San Diego Convention Center, San Diego, CA and at a Press Briefing on Oct. 29 at 12:50 pm in Room 12.

ASN Renal Week 2009, the largest nephrology meeting of its kind, will provide a forum for 13,000 professionals to discuss the latest findings in renal research and engage in educational sessions related to advances in the care of patients with kidney and related disorders. Renal Week 2009 will take place October 27 - November 1 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego.

Founded in 1966, the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) is the world's largest professional society devoted to the study of kidney disease. Comprised of 11,000 physicians and scientists, ASN continues to promote expert patient care, to advance medical research, and to educate the renal community. ASN also informs policymakers about issues of importance to kidney doctors and their patients. ASN funds research, and through its world-renowned meetings and first-class publications, disseminates information and educational tools that empower physicians.

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.