[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 29-Oct-2009
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Contact: Shari Leventhal
sleventhal@asn-online.org
202-558-8423
American Society of Nephrology

Talking increases kidney donation

Group chats about kidney transplantation increase loved ones' willingness to donate

Get-togethers with a kidney disease patient's family and friends can improve their willingness to consider donation, according to a paper being presented at the American Society of Nephrology's 42nd Annual Meeting and Scientific Exposition in San Diego, CA. The findings indicate that group-education of patients' relatives and friends is an effective way to help alleviate the organ shortage and increase living donations.

While kidney transplantation from a living donor is the best treatment option for most patients with kidney failure, living donation is often overlooked because family members and friends are not aware that they could be potential donors and patients are reluctant or embarrassed to ask their loved ones for a kidney.

Ton van Kooy, MD, Marinus van den Dorpel, MD (Maasstadziekenhuis, Rotterdam, Netherlands), and their colleagues developed an intervention that addresses both of these issues. They invited relatives and friends of kidney disease patients to attend a meeting—usually at the patient's home—to get information about kidney disease, its impact on life, and how they could help the patient. An experienced hospital social worker and a trained nurse practitioner took part in the discussions, and they provided information on the differences between dialysis and kidney transplantation, including the risks and benefits of living kidney donation for both recipient and donor.

In all 10 groups that participated in these discussions, the patients, relatives, and friends unanimously welcomed the approach and felt an improved understanding and bonding within the group. Within three months, potential kidney donors came forward from all 10 groups. The results indicate that group education may enhance individuals' willingness to consider living kidney donation, which offers great potential benefits to patients.

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The authors report no financial disclosures. Study co-authors include Ron van Bragt, Diana van Dongen-Segeren, and Daenne Scheuter-van Oers (Maasstadziekenhuis, Rotterdam, Netherlands).

EDITOR: "Group Education of Families and Friends of CKD Patients; The Impact on Living Kidney Donation," (TH-PO1025) will be presented as part of a Poster Session at the American Society of Nephrology's 42nd Annual Meeting and Scientific Exposition on Oct. 29 from 10:00 am to 12:00 pm in the Scientific Exposition Hall of the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.

ASN Renal Week 2009, the largest nephrology meeting of its kind, will provide a forum for 13,000 professionals to discuss the latest findings in renal research and engage in educational sessions related to advances in the care of patients with kidney and related disorders. Renal Week 2009 will take place October 27 – November 1 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego.

Founded in 1966, the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) is the world's largest professional society devoted to the study of kidney disease. Comprised of 11,000 physicians and scientists, ASN continues to promote expert patient care, to advance medical research, and to educate the renal community. ASN also informs policymakers about issues of importance to kidney doctors and their patients. ASN funds research, and through its world-renowned meetings and first-class publications, disseminates information and educational tools that empower physicians.



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