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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
29-Oct-2009

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Contact: Shari Leventhal
sleventhal@asn-online.org
202-558-8423
American Society of Nephrology
@ASNKidney

Younger doctors recommend kidney transplantations earlier

Study says veteran physicians wait longer to refer patients

Compared with veteran doctors, recent medical school graduates are more likely to refer chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients for kidney transplantation before their patients require dialysis, according to a paper being presented at the American Society of Nephrology's 42nd Annual Meeting and Scientific Exposition in San Diego, CA. These findings suggest that more recent medical training is associated with early referral. This is potentially due to a lack of knowledge about preemptive kidney transplantation among more veteran physicians.

Advanced CKD patients who receive a kidney transplant before they require dialysis (a "preemptive" transplantation) tend to live longer, have better transplanted kidney function and improved quality of life, than patients who require dialysis before a transplant. Therefore, the National Kidney Foundation guidelines published in 2007 recommend the promotion of early and preemptive kidney transplantation. However, only a fraction of kidney transplantations are performed preemptively. Referring physicians are an important element in the early referral of CKD patients leading to preemptive kidney transplantation. However, little is known about the characteristics of physicians who refer CKD patients in time for preemptive kidney transplantation.

Daniela Ladner, MD, MPH, (Northwestern University) and her colleagues analyzed information from all adult patients who received a living donor kidney transplant at their institution between January 2006 and May 2009. A total of 446 living donor kidney transplantations were analyzed; 137 were preemptive, while 309 were performed after initiation of dialysis. The investigators found that doctors closer to completion of medical school were significantly more likely to refer their CKD patients in time for preemptive transplantation. It is conceivable that the reason for this finding is that younger physicians are more likely to have learned about the benefits of preemptive kidney transplantation during their education. Hence they might be more prone to refer CKD early in their disease process, the authors concluded. "This is a single-center study and further investigation is necessary. However, based on our findings, educating veteran referring MDs about preemptive living donor kidney transplantation might increase the number of early referral to transplant centers," they noted.

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The authors report no financial disclosures. Study co-authors include Vadim Lyuksemburg, BS; Raymond Chang, MA; Olivia Ross, MPH; Juan Carlos Caicedo, MD; Anton Skaro, MD, PhD; John Friedewald, MD; Michael Abecassis, MD, MBA; and Jane Holl, MD, MPH (Northwestern University).

Dr. Ladner will be available remotely by phone and email during Renal Week to address questions about her study but will be unavailable to provide in-person onsite interviews.

The study abstract, "The Impact of Physician Years Since Graduation on Patient Referrals for Preemptive Living Donor Kidney Transplantation," (TH-PO1033) will be presented as part of a Poster Session during the American Society of Nephrology's 42nd Annual Meeting and Scientific Exposition on Oct. 29, between 10:00 am and 12:00 pm in the Scientific Exposition Hall of the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.

ASN Renal Week 2009, the largest nephrology meeting of its kind, will provide a forum for 13,000 professionals to discuss the latest findings in renal research and engage in educational sessions related to advances in the care of patients with kidney and related disorders. Renal Week 2009 will take place October 27 - November 1 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego.

Founded in 1966, the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) is the world's largest professional society devoted to the study of kidney disease. Comprised of 11,000 physicians and scientists, ASN continues to promote expert patient care, to advance medical research, and to educate the renal community. ASN also informs policymakers about issues of importance to kidney doctors and their patients. ASN funds research, and through its world-renowned meetings and first-class publications, disseminates information and educational tools that empower physicians.



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