[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 26-Oct-2009
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Contact: Charlotte Webber
charlotte.webber@biomedcentral.com
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BioMed Central

Genes that drive you to drink (but don't make you an alcoholic)

Your genetic make up may predispose you to drink more but may not increase your genetic risk for alcoholism (alcohol dependence). Research published in the open access journal, BMC Biology, pinpoints genetic pathways and genes associated with levels of alcohol consumption but not with alcohol dependence in rats and humans.

Led by Boris Tabakoff, Laura Saba and Paula Hoffman from the University of Colorado, Denver, USA, the research team used rats to identify the genetic pathways affecting alcohol drinking behaviour. They found that the rats' drinking behavior was linked to the pleasure and reward pathways in the brain and also linked to some of the same genetic systems that control satiety and appetite for food. Next, they directly compared genes involved in these alcohol-associated pathways in rats with the human versions of these genes in two male study groups from Montreal and Sydney to identify common genetic factors linked to alcohol use across species.

A novel result of these studies was that genes identified as contributors to drinking behavior in the tested populations were not the same as genes found to predispose to alcohol dependence.

According to Tabakoff, "We know that high levels of alcohol consumption can increase the risk of becoming alcohol dependent in those who have a genetic make up that predisposes to dependence. This is a case of interaction between genes and environment. Indeed, in our study we found that, higher alcohol consumption in humans was positively correlated with alcohol dependence. However, because different sets of genes seem to influence the level of alcohol consumption, as opposed to propensity for alcohol dependence, we are confronted with great variation in humans. Individuals with a set of genes that predisposes them to drink moderate amounts of alcohol may still have the genetic predisposition to lose control over their drinking behavior, and perhaps become alcohol dependent. Conversely, individuals with a genetic predisposition to drink high amounts of alcohol may not have the genes that predispose them to become dependent."

The authors stress that, "The phenotype we investigated in this paper is non-dependent alcohol intake, and the genes that influence this phenotype."

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Notes to Editors:

1. Genetical genomic determinants of alcohol consumption in rats and humans
Boris Tabakoff, Laura Saba, Morton Printz, Pam Flodman, Colin Hodgkinson, David Goldman, George Koob, Heather N Richardson, Katerina Kechris, Richard L Bell, Norbert Hubner, Matthias Heinig, Michal Pravenec, Jonathan Mangion, Lucie Legault, Maurice Dongier, Katherine M Conigrave, John B Whitfield, John Saunders, Bridget Grant, Paula L Hoffman and WHO/ISBRA Study on State and Trait Markers of Alcoholism
BMC Biology (in press)

During embargo, article available here: http://www.biomedcentral.com/imedia/1008226947310630_article.pdf?random=38899

After the embargo, article available at journal website: http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcbiol/

Please name the journal in any story you write. If you are writing for the web, please link to the article. All articles are available free of charge, according to BioMed Central's open access policy.

Article citation and URL available on request at press@biomedcentral.com on the day of publication

2. BMC Biology - the flagship biology journal of the BMC series - publishes research and methodology articles of special importance and broad interest in any area of biology and biomedical sciences. BMC Biology (ISSN 1741-7007) is covered by PubMed, MEDLINE, BIOSIS, CAS, Scopus, EMBASE, Zoological Record, Thomson Reuters (ISI) and Google Scholar.

3. BioMed Central (http://www.biomedcentral.com/) is an STM (Science, Technology and Medicine) publisher which has pioneered the open access publishing model. All peer-reviewed research articles published by BioMed Central are made immediately and freely accessible online, and are licensed to allow redistribution and reuse. BioMed Central is part of Springer Science+Business Media, a leading global publisher in the STM sector.



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