[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 19-Oct-2009
[ | E-mail Share Share ]

Contact: Holly Korschun
hkorsch@emory.edu
404-727-3990
Emory University

Researchers optimizing progesterone for brain injury treatment

New approaches include adding vitamin D and using water-soluble analogues

As doctors begin to test progesterone for traumatic brain injury at sites across the country, researchers are looking ahead to optimizing the hormone's effectiveness.

Two abstracts summarizing Emory research on progesterone are being presented at the 2009 Society for Neuroscience (SFN) meeting in Chicago.

A multisite phase III clinical trial called ProTECT III will begin to evaluate progesterone's effectiveness for treating traumatic brain injury early next year. The trial grows out of years of research by Donald Stein, PhD, Asa G. Candler Professor of Emergency Medicine at Emory School of Medicine, demonstrating that progesterone can protect damaged brain tissue. Stein is director of the Department of Emergency Medicine's Brain Research Laboratory.

One of the SFN abstracts reports on progesterone analogues that are more water-soluble. This work comes from Stein and his colleagues in collaboration with the laboratory of Dennis Liotta, PhD, Emory professor of chemistry.

Currently, the lack of water solubility limits delivery of progesterone, in that the hormone must be prepared hours ahead and cannot be kept at room temperature. Small chemical modifications may allow similar compounds with the same effects as progesterone to be given to patients closer to the time of injury.

According to the results, two compounds similar to progesterone showed an equivalent ability to reduce brain swelling in an animal model of traumatic brain injury.

The second abstract describes evidence that adding vitamin D to progesterone enhances the hormone's effectiveness when applied to neurons under stress in the laboratory. Like progesterone, vitamin D is a steroid hormone that is inexpensive, has good safety properties and acts on many different biochemical pathways.

The authors showed that a low amount of vitamin D boosted the ability of progesterone to protect neurons from excito-toxicity , a principal cause of brain injury and cell death.

###

First abstract
Time: Mon, Oct 19, 11 a.m. - noon
Authors: I. Sayeed, C. J. MacNevin, F. Atif, D. C. Liotta, D. G. Stein
Title: Development and screening of water soluble analogues of progesterone: Potential for an innovative, safe and effective approach to acute traumatic brain injury treatment

This research was recently published online by the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19791804

Second abstract
Time: Tue, Oct 20, 11:15 - 11:30 AM
Authors: F. Atif, I. Sayeed, T. Ishrat, D. G. Stein;
Title: Progesterone with vitamin D affords better neuroprotection against excitotoxicity in cultured cortical neurons than progesterone alone

The vitamin D research was recently published by the journal Molecular Medicine. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19603099

The Robert W. Woodruff Health Sciences Center of Emory University is an academic health science and service center focused on missions of teaching, research, health care and public service. Its components include the Emory University School of Medicine, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, and Rollins School of Public Health; Yerkes National Primate Research Center; Emory Winship Cancer Institute; and Emory Healthcare, the largest, most comprehensive health system in Georgia. Emory Healthcare includes: The Emory Clinic, Emory-Children's Center, Emory University Hospital, Emory University Hospital Midtown, Wesley Woods Center, Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital, the jointly owned Emory-Adventist Hospital, and EHCA, a limited liability company created with Hospital Corporation of America. EHCA includes two joint venture hospitals, Emory Eastside Medical Center and Emory Johns Creek Hospital. The Woodruff Health Sciences Center has a $2.3 billion budget, 18,000 employees, 2,500 full-time and 1,500 affiliated faculty, 4,300 students and trainees, and a $5.5 billion economic impact on metro Atlanta.



[ Back to EurekAlert! ] [ | E-mail Share Share ]

 


AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.