[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 12-Jan-2010
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Contact: April Kemick
april.kemick@utoronto.ca
416-978-5949
University of Toronto

When work interferes with life

Study reveals new insights about a common stressor

TORONTO, ON – As many as 50 per cent of people bring their work home with them regularly, according to new research out of the University of Toronto that describes the stress associated with work-life balance and the factors that predict it.

Researchers measured the extent to which work was interfering with personal time using data from a national survey of 1,800 American workers. Sociology professor Scott Schieman (UofT) and his coauthors Melissa Milkie (University of Maryland) and PhD student Paul Glavin (UofT) asked participants questions like: "How often does your job interfere with your home or family life?"; "How often does your job interfere with your social or leisure activities?"; and "How often do you think about things going on at work when you are not working?"

Schieman says, "Nearly half of the population reports that these situations occur 'sometimes' or 'frequently,' which is particularly concerning given that the negative health impacts of an imbalance between work life and private life are well-documented."

The authors describe five core sets of findings:

"We found several surprising patterns," says Schieman. "People who are well-educated, professionals and those with job-related resources report that their work interferes with their personal lives more frequently, reflecting what we refer to as 'the stress of higher status.' While many benefits undoubtedly accrue to those in higher status positions and conditions, a downside is the greater likelihood of work interfering with personal life."

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For more information on the study, appearing in the December 2009 issue of the journal American Sociological Review, please contact:

Scott Schieman, lead author: 416-946-5905 or scott.schieman@utoronto.ca

April Kemick, media relations officer: 416-978-5949 or april.kemick@utoronto.ca



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