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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
8-Mar-2010

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Contact: Jill Maxick
jmaxick@prometheusbooks.com
800-853-7545
Prometheus Books

Which came first: Religion or the brain?

Anthropologist/neuroscientist team propose that religion is ubiquitous and persistent because the human brain needs it

IMAGE: "God's Brain " (ISBN 978-1-61614-164-6) is published by Prometheus Books.

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In the fractious debate on the existence of God and the nature of religion, two distinguished scientists radically alter the discussion. Taking a perspective rooted in evolutionary biology with a focus on brain science, in GOD'S BRAIN (Prometheus Books, $25) renowned anthropologist Lionel Tiger and pioneering neuroscientist Michael McGuire elucidate perennial questions about religion: What is its purpose? How did it arise? What is its source? And why does every known culture have some form of it?

Their answer is deceptively simple, yet at the same time highly complex: The brain creates religion and its varied concepts of God, and in turn feeds on its creation to satisfy innate neurological and associated social needs.

"Tiger and McGuire have concocted an amazing and insightful look--based on sound science--into how the human brain seeks religion," says R. Curtis Ellison, MD, professor of medicine and public health, Boston University School of Medicine. "Their book beautifully describes how belief, ritual, and socialization within a closed group work together to help humans survive the stresses of everyday life."

IMAGE: Lionel Tiger (New York, NY) is the bestselling author of "Men in Groups ", "The Imperial Animal " (with Robin Fox), "The Pursuit of Pleasure ", "Optimism: The Biology of Hope ", and "The...

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Brain science reveals that humans and other primates alike are afflicted by unavoidable sources of stress that the authors describe as "brainpain." To cope with this affliction, people seek to "brainsoothe." In GOD'S BRAIN, Tiger and McGuire look at how humans use religion and its social structures to induce "brainsoothing" as a relief for innate anxiety.

Among other topics, they consider religion's role in providing positive socialization, its seeming obsession with regulating sex, creating an afterlife, how religion's rules of behavior influence the law, the common biological scaffolding between nonhuman primates and humans and how this affects religion, a detailed look at brain chemistry and how it changes as a result of stress, and evidence that the palliative effects of religion on brain chemistry is not matched by nonreligious remedies.

Robin Fox, university professor of social theory at Rutgers University says, "With economy, evidence, and no little wit and elegance, Lionel Tiger and Michael McGuire look for the answer to religion's ubiquity and persistence in the only place possible: the human brain. A...serious and informative argument."

GOD'S BRAIN is "a scientific take on religion that is not at the same time trying to destroy it" adds Melvin Konner, author of The Tangled Wing: Biological Constraints on the Human Spirit. The thesis provides key insights into the complexities of our brain and the role of religion, perhaps the brain's most remarkable creation.

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About the Authors:

Lionel Tiger (New York, NY) is the bestselling author of "Men in Groups", "The Imperial Animal" (with Robin Fox), "The Pursuit of Pleasure", "Optimism: The Biology of Hope", and "The Decline of Males". His articles have appeared in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Rolling Stone, Harvard Business Review, and Brain and Behavioral Science. He is the Charles Darwin Professor of Anthropology at Rutgers University.

Michael McGuire, MD (Cottonwood, CA), is the author or editor of ten books, including "Darwinian Psychiatry" (with A. Troisi). He is the president of the Biomedical Research Foundation, director of the Bradshaw Foundation and the Gruter Institute of Law and Behavior, and a trustee of the International Society of Human Ethology. Formerly, he was a professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at the University of California at Los Angeles and editor of Ethology and Sociobiology.



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