[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 25-Mar-2010
[ | E-mail Share Share ]

Contact: Dr. Gernot Laengst
gernot.laengst@vkl.uni-regensburg.de
49-941-943-2849
Public Library of Science

New insights into the 3-D organization of the human genome

Insights into the genomics of the human nucleolus have been revealed in a study by researchers from the University of Regensburg and the Ludwig Maximilians University in Germany and the Centro de Investigación Príncipe Felipe in Spain. The research, published March 26 in the open-access journal PLoS Genetics, sheds new light on the functional organization of human genetic material.

One major challenge of the post-genomic era is to understand how the genome is organized inside the cell's nucleus to fulfill the dynamics and regulation of DNA access to regulatory factors. Previous studies on the nuclear architecture of the cell suggest that the three-dimensional structure of genomic information is non-random. However, few discrete genomic loci have been analyzed for their spatial location, prompting the current study.

The researchers, led by Attila Németh and Gernot Längst, examined the DNA network of the nucleolus, the nucleus' largest sub-compartment, using sequencing, microarray analysis, and single-cell analysis. The work resulted in a high-resolution sequence map of this nuclear structure, detailing the position of the several thousand genes and non-coding sequences that form the nucleolus within the three-dimensional space of the nucleus.

"The results help us understand how nuclear information is packaged into functional compartments of the nucleus," say the authors. At the same time, the authors emphasise that this research was confined to just two cell types, and that further studies are needed to address the conservation of these packaging mechanisms during evolution, and to monitor the developmental dynamics of three-dimensional genome organization.

###

FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE: GL and TC are supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG); GL by the Bayerisches Genomforschungsnetzwerk (BayGene); AN and GL by the University of Regensburg - DFG Anschubfinanzierung; and AC, DM, IM, JS-L, and JD by grants from project BIO BIO2008-04212 from the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (MICINN) and grant (RD06/0020/1019) from Red Temática de Investigación Cooperativa en Cáncer (RTICC), Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), MICINN. The National Institute of Bioinformatics (www.inab.org) is a platform of Genoma Espana. The CIBER de enfermedades raras is an initiative of the ISCIII. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

COMPETING INTERESTS: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

CITATION: Németh A, Conesa A, Santoyo-Lopez J, Medina I, Montaner D, et al. (2010) Initial Genomics of the Human Nucleolus. PLoS Genet 6(3): e1000889. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1000889

IN YOUR COVERAGE, PLEASE USE THIS URL TO LINK TO THE FREELY AVAILABLE ARTICLE (the link will go live when the embargo ends): <http:// http://www.plosgenetics.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pgen.1000889>

CONTACT:
Prof. Dr. Gernot Längst
Managing Director of RIGeL - Regensburg International Graduate School of Life Sciences
Biochemistry III
Universität Regensburg
Regensburg
Germany
Email: gernot.laengst@vkl.uni-regensburg.de
Phone: 00 49 941 943 2849

Disclaimer

This press release refers to an upcoming article in PLoS Genetics. The release is provided by the article authors and their institutions. Any opinions expressed in this release or article are the personal views of the journal staff and/or article contributors, and do not necessarily represent the views or policies of PLoS. PLoS expressly disclaims any and all warranties and liability in connection with the information found in the releases and articles and your use of such information.

About PLoS Genetics

PLoS Genetics (http://www.plosgenetics.org) reflects the full breadth and interdisciplinary nature of genetics and genomics research by publishing outstanding original contributions in all areas of biology.

About the Public Library of Science

The Public Library of Science (PLoS) is a non-profit organization of scientists and physicians committed to making the world's scientific and medical literature a freely available public resource. For more information, visit http://www.plos.org.



[ Back to EurekAlert! ] [ | E-mail Share Share ]

 


AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.