[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 18-Mar-2010
[ | E-mail Share Share ]

Contact: Dawn Peters
medicalnews@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley-Blackwell

Bailout stenting successful treatment for infants with constricted aortas

Early stenting results in better surgical outcomes

Cardiac interventionalists and surgeons at University Clinic in Leuven, Belgium have achieved successful stent implantation and follow-up coarctectomy in premature infants suffering from aortic coarctation. Full findings are published in the March issue of Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions, the official journal of The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions.

Aortic coarctation is a common congenital condition characterized by a narrowing of the aorta, a major blood vessel leaving the heart. The narrowed aorta reduces blood flow to the lower extremities and causes heart failure in infants. The condition may be diagnosed at birth or in early childhood, at which time it can be corrected by surgery, however surgical repair is extremely risky in premature babies. Prostaglandin E1 infusion is the standard treatment to recover or maintain systemic flow in a neonate (infant) with critical coarctation prior to elective surgical repair. However, this treatment may not restore sufficient blood flow in time and can be associated with considerable side effects when given for a prolonged time.

A research team led by Marc Gewillig, M.D., Ph.D., evaluated the safety and efficacy of stenting a coarcted aortic arch in critically ill neonates in order to defer corrective surgery until the infants had stabilized and gained weight. Dr. Gewillig explained, "Significant arch obstruction in critically ill infants currently requires a surgical intervention, but how and when to proceed with the surgery is crucial to successful outcomes. Our goal of stenting the coarctation was to provide the surgeon with a bigger and better patient for surgery to correct the arch obstruction."

The study covered 15 infants less than 2 months of age between January 1, 1998 and March 30, 2009. The infants were between 30-41 weeks of gestation; 8 out of 15 were premature (<37 weeks of gestation). At cardiac catheterization, the average weight of the patients was 2.5 kg and their mean age was 12 days. One group of patients had a native coarctation where surgery was not considered the best option at that time (very low-birth-weight, critically ill neonates not responding to medical treatment, complex cardiac, and noncardiac disease); a second group consisted of patients with significant early restenosis after primary surgical coarctectomy or arch repair.

Stent removal and arch reconstruction has been performed in 12 patients. One patient is still awaiting final repair. In patients with simple stented coarctation, the stent was removed after 2.8 months. In complex cardiac malformation, stents were removed after 3.0 months. The decision when to remove the stent was made for every patient individually: criteria were hemodynamic stability after the cardiogenic shock, adequate body weight to safely perform coarctectomy, or when additional surgery was planned. Most patients with simple coarctation could easily be weaned from supportive therapy as systemic output had adequately resumed. Two deaths occurred before stent removal and were nonprocedure related.

Commenting on the surgery, Dr. Gewillig said, "The surgeon felt the procedure was not complicated by the presence of the stent and the surgery was easier to perform as all structures had grown, with some catch-up growth of the distal arch."

"This study shows that early stenting (of both native coarctation or early recoarctation post surgical coarctectomy) in critically ill infants followed by later coarctectomy can be performed safely and with good results," he concluded.

###

Article: "Bailout Stenting for Critical Coarctation in Premature/Critical/Complex/Early Recoarcted Neonates." Matthias Gorenflo, Derize E. Boshoff, Ruth Heying, Benedicte Eyskens, Filip Rega, Bart Meyns, Marc Gewillig. Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions; Published Online: March 1, 2010 (DOI: 10.1002/ccd.22386).

This study is published in Catheterization and Cardiovascular Intervention. Media wishing to receive a PDF of this article may contact medicalnews@wiley.com.

Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions is the official journal of The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions. This international journal covers the broad field of cardiovascular diseases. Subject material includes basic and clinical information that is derived from or related to invasive and interventional coronary or peripheral vascular techniques. The journal focuses on material that will be of immediate practical value to physicians providing patient care in the clinical laboratory setting. To accomplish this, the journal publishes Preliminary Reports and Work In Progress articles that complement the traditional Original Studies, Case Reports, and Comprehensive Reviews. Perspective and insight concerning controversial subjects and evolving technologies are provided regularly through Editorial Commentaries furnished by members of the Editorial Board and other experts. Articles are subject to double-blind peer review and complete editorial evaluation prior to any decision regarding acceptability. For more information, please visit http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/117934745/grouphome/home.html.

Wiley-Blackwell is the international scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly publishing business of John Wiley & Sons, with strengths in every major academic and professional field and partnerships with many of the world's leading societies. Wiley-Blackwell publishes nearly 1,500 peer-reviewed journals and 1,500+ new books annually in print and online, as well as databases, major reference works and laboratory protocols. For more information, please visit www.wileyblackwell.com or www.interscience.wiley.com.

The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) is the primary professional association for invasive and interventional cardiologists, representing over 4,300 physicians in 60 countries. The Society's mission is to promote excellence in invasive and interventional cardiovascular medicine through physician education and representation, its monthly journal Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions, and the advancement of quality standards to enhance patient care. For more information, please visit http://www.scai.org or SCAI's comprehensive patient education website, www.seconds-count.org.

Media Advisory

What: The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions 33rd Annual Scientific Sessions
Where: San Diego, CA Hilton San Diego Bayfront
When: May 5 8, 2010

The program, co-chaired by Drs. James Hermiller and Christopher J. White, will feature:

For more information, please view the preliminary program here: http://www.scaionline.org/Education/Sessions.aspx

Advance media registration is available at: http://www.scaionline.org/Education/Sessions/Media.aspx

Contact: Kathy Boyd David at kbdavid@scai.org or by phone at 202-552-0789 or 717-422-1181



[ Back to EurekAlert! ] [ | E-mail Share Share ]

 


AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.