[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 21-Apr-2010
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Contact: Heather Curry
hcurry@acr-arrs.org
703-390-9822
American College of Radiology

Researchers successfully lower radiation dose associated with pediatric chest CT scans

Adjusting the radiation dose based upon a child's weight can significantly lower the radiation dose associated with pediatric chest computed tomography (CT) scans, according to a study published in the May issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (www.ajronline.org). CT scanning combines special X-ray equipment with sophisticated computers to produce multiple images or pictures of the inside of the body.

The study, performed at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Stanford School of Medicine, in Stanford, CA, included 120 children who underwent chest CT scans — 60 children weighed less than 15 kg (33 pounds) and 60 weighed between 15 and 16 kg (33 – 132 pounds). Radiologists adjusted their chest CT protocols by lowering the radiation dose according to patient weight.

"For children weighing less than 33 pounds, we were able to reduce the radiation dose by approximately 73 percent," said Beverley Newman, MD, lead author of the study. "For children weighing between 33 and 132 pounds, we were able to reduce the radiation dose by approximately 48 percent," said Newman.

"CT examinations are commonly performed in the pediatric population. However radiation dose related to CT has become a public health concern, and appropriate reduction of radiation dose has become an important goal in pediatric CT," she said.

"While it is important to keep radiation doses as low as possible, it is important not to compromise the diagnostic usefulness of the scan. In our study, lowering the radiation dose did increase image noise resulting in grainy images. However the low dose examinations were still considered diagnostically acceptable," said Newman.

"As our study suggests, significant dose reduction can be achieved for routine pediatric chest CT by paying attention to simple protocol adjustments based upon patient weight," she said.

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This study appears in the May issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology. For a copy of the full study or to request an interview with Dr. Newman, please contact Heather Curry via email at hcurry@acr-arrs.org or at 703-390-9822.

About ARRS

The American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS) was founded in 1900 and is the oldest radiology society in the United States. Its monthly journal, the American Journal of Roentgenology, began publication in 1906. Radiologists from all over the world attend the ARRS annual meeting to participate in instructional courses, scientific paper presentations and scientific and commercial exhibits related to the field of radiology. The Society is named after the first Nobel Laureate in Physics, Wilhelm Röentgen, who discovered the x-ray in 1895.



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