Public Release:  Indeterminate breast lesions found in high-risk patients should be evaluated aggressively to exclude malignancy

American College of Radiology

Short-term follow-up is often used to evaluate indeterminate breast lesions found on breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, researchers have found that indeterminate lesions (found in women with a high risk of breast cancer) should be evaluated sooner to exclude a possible malignancy, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2010 Annual Meeting in San Diego, CA.

Breast lesions that cannot be definitively classified as suspicious for malignancy or benign are considered indeterminate. "A short-term follow-up MRI, ultrasound, and/or mammographic investigation is usually recommended for indeterminate lesions found in high-risk women," said Martin Korzeniowski, MD, lead author of the study. "However, that may not be soon enough," said Korzeniowski. High-risk women include those who have breast cancer, a history of breast cancer, or a genetic predisposition.

The study, performed at McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada, included 59 lesions in 55 patients that were identified on breast MRI as indeterminate. "Of those indeterminate lesions, a significant number (22 percent) were proven positive for malignancy on follow-up and subsequent biopsy," he said.

"In our study, the cancer yield was substantial for indeterminate lesions identified on initial contrast-enhanced breast MRI which suggests that those lesions should be evaluated more aggressively to exclude malignancy and increase one's chances for survival," said Korzeniowski.

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This study will be presented on Monday, May 3 at 1:20 p.m. Pacific Time. For a copy of the abstract or to schedule an interview with Dr. Korzeniowski, please contact Heather Curry via E-MAIL at hcurry@acr-arrs.org.

About ARRS

The American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS) was founded in 1900 and is the oldest radiology society in the United States. Its monthly journal, the American Journal of Roentgenology, began publication in 1906. Radiologists from all over the world attend the ARRS annual meeting to participate in instructional courses, scientific paper presentations and scientific and commercial exhibits related to the field of radiology. The Society is named after the first Nobel Laureate in Physics, Wilhelm Röentgen, who discovered the x-ray in 1895.

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