[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 7-May-2010
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Contact: Heather Curry
hcurry@acr-arrs.org
703-390-9822
American College of Radiology

Unlike CT, standard X-rays don't detect the majority of pelvic injuries, study suggests

Computed tomography (CT) scans are superior to standard radiography (X-rays) for the detection of pelvic fractures, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2010 Annual Meeting in San Diego, CA. CT scanning combines special X-ray equipment with sophisticated computers to produce multiple images of pictures of the inside of the body.

The study, performed at Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, PA, included 132 patients with pelvic fractures who were evaluated using standard X-rays (with special views to detect pelvic fractures) and CT. "Based on the results of our retrospective study, pelvic X-rays, especially special views, failed to identify 48 percent of pelvic injuries and also failed to add any significant value to patient care," said Zulfiqar Ali, MD, lead author of the study.

"Most orthopedic surgeons order special, additional X-ray views after a CT scan has been performed and a diagnosis confirmed. We recommend that these additional views be eliminated since pelvic CT, with multi-planar and three dimensional reconstructed images, is sufficient for complete evaluation of suspected pelvic injuries," said Ali.

"Eliminating these extra pelvic X-rays altogether in cases of suspected pelvic injury can reduce the overall radiation dose to patients; reduce patient discomfort and pain by eliminating unnecessary movements in an injured patient; reduce cost; and ultimately provide faster service to patients," he said.

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This study will be presented on Friday, May 7 at 11:40 a.m. Pacific Time. For a copy of the abstract or to schedule an interview with Dr. Strickland, please contact Heather Curry via E-MAIL at hcurry@acr-arrs.org.

About ARRS

The American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS) was founded in 1900 and is the oldest radiology society in the United States. Its monthly journal, the American Journal of Roentgenology, began publication in 1906. Radiologists from all over the world attend the ARRS annual meeting to participate in instructional courses, scientific paper presentations and scientific and commercial exhibits related to the field of radiology. The Society is named after the first Nobel Laureate in Physics, Wilhelm Röentgen, who discovered the x-ray in 1895.



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