[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 22-Jun-2010
[ | E-mail Share Share ]

Contact: Graeme Baldwin
graeme.baldwin@biomedcentral.com
44-020-319-22165
BioMed Central

Striped mice -- the neighbors from hell

Fighting, paternity tests and infidelity. No, not a daytime talk show, but the results of new research examining why the fur will fly if a four-striped grass mouse (Rhabdomys pumilio) wanders into his neighbour's territory. Researchers writing in BioMed Central's open access journal Frontiers in Zoology investigated aggression in the mammalian species, finding that breeding males are much more concerned with repelling their neighbours than with defending their partners from complete strangers.

Carsten Schradin from the University of Zurich, Switzerland, worked with a team of researchers to stage encounters between wild mice in a specially created 'neutral' arena. He said, "We found that breeding males tested during the breeding season showed significantly more aggression towards their neighbours than towards strange breeding males not neighbouring them. Breeding males were significantly more aggressive than non-breeders".

This 'Nasty Neighbour' phenomenon has been seen in other animals and contrasts with the 'Dear Enemy' behavior in which the breeding male will preferably attack strangers. Both are ways of limiting the cost of territorial behavior. In this field study, the researchers were able to test the paternity of offspring conceived during the study period and found that neighbouring males were more likely than the wandering strangers to sire pups with another mouse's 'harem'. According to Schradin, this may explain the animal's preference for neighbourly aggression, "We've found that the neighbours of breeding males pose a recognisable threat to the breeding male's confidence of paternity, and suggest that this explains the occurrence of the nasty neighbour phenomenon in striped mice".

###

Notes to Editors

1. The nasty neighbour in the striped mouse (Rhabdomys pumilio) steals paternity and elicits aggression
Carsten Schradin, Carola Schneider and Anna K Lindholm
Frontiers in Zoology (in press)

During embargo, article available here: http://www.frontiersinzoology.com/imedia/1273253073630173_article.pdf?random=3569

After the embargo, article available at the journal website: http://www.frontiersinzoology.com/

Please name the journal in any story you write. If you are writing for the web, please link to the article. All articles are available free of charge, according to BioMed Central's open access policy.

Article citation and URL available on request at press@biomedcentral.com on the day of publication.

2. Frontiers in Zoology is an Open Access, peer-reviewed, online journal publishing high quality research articles and reviews on all aspects of animal life.

3. BioMed Central (http://www.biomedcentral.com/) is an STM (Science, Technology and Medicine) publisher which has pioneered the open access publishing model. All peer-reviewed research articles published by BioMed Central are made immediately and freely accessible online, and are licensed to allow redistribution and reuse. BioMed Central is part of Springer Science+Business Media, a leading global publisher in the STM sector.



[ Back to EurekAlert! ] [ | E-mail Share Share ]

 


AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.