[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 7-Jun-2010
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Contact: Jane-Diane Fraser
jfraser@hsf.ca
613-569-4361 x273
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada

Daughters caring for a parent recovering from stroke more prone to depression than sons

Quebec City – Adult daughters caring for a parent recovering from stroke are more prone to depression than sons, Marina Bastawrous today told the Canadian Stroke Congress, co-hosted by the Canadian Stroke Network, the Heart and Stroke Foundation, and the Canadian Stroke Consortium.

Caring for a parent who has experienced a stroke results in a dramatic shift from the usual parent-child relationship. "Stroke can be particularly challenging for families," says Bastawrous, a masters candidate at the University of Toronto. "Taking care of elderly parents can bring out family strengths and family weaknesses."

The adult child-to-parent bond can result in excellent care when a senior has a stroke. But not always, she says.

The study found that close and secure relationships with parents predicted better mental health and greater satisfaction in adult child caregivers.

"But strained relationships before or following the stroke increases depression in daughters," she says. "If the relationship between a parent and adult daughter is already strained, a stroke can make things even worse."

The quality of relationships both before and after the stroke had an equally important influence on wellbeing.

The study found that adult daughters placed greater importance on family relationships than sons and, in turn, were more negatively impacted by poor relationships with their parent.

"When a parent has a stroke, adult children often become their primary caregivers," says Heart and Stroke Foundation spokesperson Dr. Michael Hill. "It's important that as part of the recovery process we examine their experiences because they are obviously vital to the ongoing care of the stroke patient."

Sandwich generation spread too thin

Study co-author Dr. Jill Cameron says adult children providing stroke care for their parents need help and they need it now.

"Adult children are stroke care's forgotten generation," she says. "We can't afford to leave them behind."

Sixty two percent of stroke caregivers are adult children. Yet stroke care interventions are overwhelmingly designed for spouses.

This imbalance must be addressed, says Dr. Cameron. "We need to make better use of financial resources to enhance the support provided to this growing population of caregivers."

She notes that adult children caregivers need to balance the challenges of professional life, family life, and the added responsibility of taking on the care of somebody post-stroke. "Caregivers need more support," she says. "They aren't trained but their role is essential."

To remove some of the strain − financial and emotional − innovative thinking is required.

"Our healthcare system is not sustainable in the face of rising costs," says Dr. Cameron. "We need to plan."

Here's what Dr. Cameron envisions as part of this plan:

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Statements and conclusions of study authors are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect Foundation or CSN policy or position. The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada and the Canadian Stroke Network make no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability.

The Canadian Stroke Network (canadianstrokenetwork.ca) includes more than 100 of Canada's leading scientists and clinicians from 24 universities who work collaboratively on various aspects of stroke. The network, which is headquartered at the University of Ottawa, also includes partners from industry, the non-profit sector, provincial and federal governments. The Canadian Stroke Network, one of Canada's Networks of Centres of Excellence, is committed to reducing the physical, social and economic impact of stroke on the lives of individual Canadians and on society as a whole.

The Heart and Stroke Foundation (heartandstroke.ca), a volunteer-based health charity, leads in eliminating heart disease and stroke and reducing their impact through the advancement of research and its application, the promotion of healthy living, and advocacy.

For more information and/or interviews, contact
The CSC 2010 MEDIA OFFICE (JUNE 7 and 8) at 418-649-5232

OR contact Hémisphère Relations Publiques
Marie-José Bégin
514-994-0802
mj_begin@videotron.ca

France Gaignard
514-616-7705

Congress information and media registration is at www.strokecongress.ca

After June 8, 2010, contact:
Jane-Diane Fraser
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada
(613) 569-4361 ext 273, jfraser@hsf.ca



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