[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 23-Jun-2010
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Contact: Amy Molnar
healthnews@wiley.com
Wiley-Blackwell

Risk factors for venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism differ between races

Study shows true causes remain unknown

A new study of 1,960 White-Americans and 368 Black-Americans with objectively diagnosed venous thromboembolism (VTE) showed that, compared to Whites, Blacks had a significantly higher proportion with pulmonary embolism (PE), including idiopathic PE among Black women, and a significantly higher proportion of Blacks with VTE were women (71% vs 61% for Whites) The study is published today in the American Journal of Hematology.

VTE is blood clots in veins and consists of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a blood clot in the "inner" or "deep" vein, typically of the leg or pelvis, and its complication, PE, a dislodged DVT that has traveled with the returning blood to the heart and become lodged in the lungs. Most epidemiologic studies of VTE risk factors have been conducted within White-American and -European populations. However, compared to Whites, Black-Americans appear to have a higher risk and incidence of VTE. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (DNA sequence variations), factor V Leiden (G1691A) and prothrombin (G20210A), have been identified as risk factors for DVT and PE in Europeans and White-Americans, but not Black- Americans.

"VTE appears to be more common in Blacks than Whites, but while we have identified many inherited causes for VTE in Whites, no such inherited causes in Blacks have been identified," said lead researcher Prof. John Heit, of the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Minnesota, USA. "We wondered whether Blacks were more likely to have VTE related to common exposures that can cause VTE, such as major surgery, hospitalization for acute medical illness, trauma, fracture, or birth control pills, to account for VTE being more common in Blacks, but this does not appear to be the case. Thus, we now question whether Blacks may have some as yet unidentified inherited cause for VTE."

The researchers found that, compared to Whites with VTE, Blacks with VTE have a higher proportion of PE events, a lower proportion of VTE related to transient risk factors and a higher proportion with idiopathic VTE, i.e. from a seemingly unknown or unrelated cause.

Blacks had a significantly higher mean BMI, and a significantly lower proportion with recent surgery, trauma or infection, family history of VTE and documented thrombophilia. Conversely, Blacks had a significantly higher proportion with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease and dialysis, HIV and sickle cell disease. Compared to White women, Black women had a significantly lower proportion with recent oral contraceptive use or hormone therapy

"Given the poor survival after PE, our finding of an increased prevalence of PE among Blacks (particularly idiopathic PE) is disturbing, especially when coupled with previous reports of increased complications after VTE and higher PE case-fatality among Blacks," added Heit.

The study is accompanied by an editorial by Dr. Samuel Goldhaber of Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA.

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These studies are published in the July issue of the American Journal of Hematology. Media wishing to receive a PDF of either paper may contact healthnews@wiley.com

Full citation: JA Heit et al; Comparison of Characteristics from White- and Black-Americans with Venous Thromboembolism: A Cross Sectional Study; American Journal of Hematology, 2010; DOI: 10.1002/ajh.21735

About the author: John A. Heit, M.D., FACP, FACC, is Director of Coagulation Laboratories and Professor of Medicine at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, MN, USA. To arrange an interview with Professor Heit, please contact Traci Klein from Mayo Clinic's Public Information office on 507-284-5005 or Klein.Traci@mayo.edu.

About the Journal:

The American Journal of Hematology provides broad coverage of experimental and clinical features of blood diseases in humans and in animal models of human disease. The journal publishes original contributions in non-malignant and malignant hematological diseases including clinical and basic studies in hemostasis and thrombosis, immunology, blood banking, and stem cell biology. For more information please visit http://www.interscience.wiley.com/ajh

About Wiley-Blackwell:

Wiley-Blackwell is the international scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly publishing business of John Wiley & Sons, with strengths in every major academic and professional field and partnerships with many of the world's leading societies. Wiley-Blackwell publishes nearly 1,500 peer-reviewed journals and 1,500+ new books annually in print and online, as well as databases, major reference works and laboratory protocols. For more information, please visit www.wileyblackwell.com or www.interscience.wiley.com.



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