[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 25-Oct-2010
[ | E-mail Share Share ]

Contact: Karen Mallet
km463@georgetown.edu
215-514-9751
Georgetown University Medical Center

Improved outcomes for HPV-positive head and neck cancer with cetuximab and IMRT

Washington, DC Studies have shown higher survival rates for people with head and neck cancers that test positive for HPV when they are treated with systemic chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Now a new study suggests outcomes are also better when radiation therapy is combined with cetuximab, a targeted therapy. The data will be presented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology, October 31st through November 4th in San Diego.

The study, conducted at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, analyzed tumors from sequentially treated patients between 2007 and 2009 with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that were treated with cetuximab and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Of these patients, six had stage III disease and 14 had stage IVa disease. The median age was 63 (age ranged from 31 to 78). The patients received IMRT for seven to eight weeks (media dose was 72.0 Gy). Cetuximab was given for a media of seven cycles. Primary tumor sites included oral cavity (1), oropharynx (12), hypopharynx (1), larynx (5), and with one site unknown.

After a median follow up of 19 months, four patients had died and 12 patients had disease progression.

"We found a statistically significant higher progression free survival rates when comparing the outcomes of patients with HPV-positive tumors to those with HPV-negative tumors," explains Keith Unger, MD, lead author of the study.

One-year progression free survival rates were 100 percent for those with HPV-positive tumors and 31 percent for those who were HPV negative. Two year progression free survival rates were 60 percent for those with HPV compared to 23 percent for those with HPV negative tumors (p=0.05).

While not statistically significant, researchers observed a trend in improved overall survival. One-year overall survival rates were 100 percent for those with HPV-positive tumors versus 83 percent in HPV-negative tumors. Two-year survival rates were 100 percent for HPV-positive tumors compared to 71 percent for HPV negative tumors (p=0.12).

"We found no correlation between overall survival or progression free survival and stage, nodal status, primary site, or the duration of radiotherapy," Unger concludes.

###

Unger reports no related financial interests.

About Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center

The Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, part of Georgetown University Medical Center and Georgetown University Hospital, seeks to improve the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cancer through innovative basic and clinical research, patient care, community education and outreach, and the training of cancer specialists of the future. Lombardi is one of only 40 comprehensive cancer centers in the nation, as designated by the National Cancer Institute, and the only one in the Washington, DC, area. For more information, go to http://lombardi.georgetown.edu.

About Georgetown University Medical Center

Georgetown University Medical Center is an internationally recognized academic medical center with a three-part mission of research, teaching and patient care (through MedStar Health). GUMC's mission is carried out with a strong emphasis on public service and a dedication to the Catholic, Jesuit principle of cura personalis -- or "care of the whole person." The Medical Center includes the School of Medicine and the School of Nursing and Health Studies, both nationally ranked, the world-renowned Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center and the Biomedical Graduate Research Organization (BGRO), home to 60 percent of the university's sponsored research funding.



[ Back to EurekAlert! ] [ | E-mail Share Share ]

 


AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.