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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
30-Nov-2010

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Contact: Jill Oviatt
oviattj@uw.edu
206-861-6684
Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

Despite economic slump, donors give generously to global health, though at a slower rate

Most development assistance for health goes to countries with the biggest health challenges, but 11 of the 30 countries with the highest disease burden receive less funding than countries with less disease and stronger economies

SEATTLE - The worst global economic crisis in decades has not stopped public and private donors from giving record amounts of money to health assistance for developing countries, according to a new report by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington.

The research shows that development assistance for health has grown 375% from $5.66 billion in 1990 to $26.87 billion in 2010. However, IHME's preliminary estimates show that the growth rate is slowing. Between 2004 and 2008, the period of the most dramatic increases in health funding, assistance grew by an annual average of 13%. But between 2008 and 2010, the rate of growth was cut by more than half to 6% annually. Most health funding has gone to the countries with the greatest need, but researchers found striking anomalies, including the fact that 11 of the 30 countries with the highest number of people suffering from disease and high mortality receive less health funding than countries with stronger economies and lower disease burdens.

The report, Financing Global Health 2010: Development assistance and country spending in economic uncertainty, will be released today at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. It provides a comprehensive picture of the total amount of health funding between 1990 and 2008 from aid agencies and governments in 23 developed countries, multilateral institutions such as the World Health Organization, and hundreds of nonprofit groups and charities. In addition, IHME developed new analytical methods that draw on government budgets, expenditure patterns, and data from funders to make preliminary estimates for 2009 and 2010, overcoming a two-year lag in the reporting of health assistance.

"Everyone in the global health community is worried about how the economic crisis is going to affect giving. We knew we couldn't wait for two years to find out," Dr. Murray said. "Research has shown that economic downturns don't usually have an immediate effect on charitable giving, but we were still surprised to see sustained growth through 2010."

The report documents the continued rise in health funding and the effects of that funding on spending for health by governments in developing countries. The report's findings include:

The researchers suggest that a likely drop-off in future health funding may not yet be apparent because of multiyear commitments made by governments in stronger economic times. They also indicate that the intensified focus on certain health issues - such as maternal, newborn, and child health, noncommunicable diseases, and health sector support - is likely to magnify the competition for limited resources and exacerbate the effects of any downturn in development assistance for health.

"More than 300,000 mothers still die every year, and more than 7 million children die before the age of 5. Chronic diseases need more attention, and countries need better health care infrastructure," Dr. Murray said. "All of these pressing health issues require funding, and it is becoming increasingly difficult to balance competing needs."

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The Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) is an independent global research center at the University of Washington providing sound measurement of population health and the factors that determine health, as well as rigorous evaluation of health system and health program performance. The Institute's goal is to improve population health by providing the best evidence possible to guide health policy - and by making that evidence easily accessible to decision-makers as they strategically fund, design, and implement programs to improve health outcomes worldwide. IHME was created in 2007 through funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the state of Washington.

For more information, please visit http://www.healthmetricsandevaluation.org

Media contact:

William Heisel
(206) 897-2886; cell: 206-612-0739
wheisel@uw.edu

The report, figures, and tables are accessible at: http://www.healthmetricsandevaluation.org



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