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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
16-Dec-2010

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Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News
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Tennis star's hospitalization for altitude sickness

During Mount Kilimanjaro ascent highlights risks of high altitude climbs

IMAGE: High Altitude Medicine & Biology, the Official Journal of the International Society for Mountain Medicine (www.ismmed.org), is an authoritative, peer-reviewed journal published quarterly online. It is the only peer-reviewed...

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New Rochelle, NY, December 16, 2010 - Former tennis champion Martina Navratilova was hospitalized for pulmonary edema--fluid build-up in the lungs--while climbing Mount Kilimanjaro, drawing attention to the high risk of acute mountain sickness (AMS) and high altitude pulmonary edema among climbers of high peaks. A timely study in a recent issue of High Altitude Medicine & Biology, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. (www.liebertpub.com), warned of the risks and serious medical outcomes associated with climbing Kilimanjaro and demonstrated that prior acclimatization to increased altitude can help protect against the development of AMS. The paper is available free online at www.liebertpub.com/ham

Altitude-related medical problems during the ascent of Mount Kilimanjaro are relatively common. Pulmonary edema is a more serious disorder than some more common forms of acute mountain sickness.

The study published in High Altitude Medicine & Biology, entitled "Incidence and predictors of acute mountain sickness among trekkers on Mount Kilimanjaro," evaluated the incidence of AMS among trekkers of this popular climbing destination. Steward Jackson, J. Kenneth Baillie, and colleagues from University of Edinburgh (Scotland) and Muhimbili University College of Health Science (Tanzania), compared the protective effect of a single rest day during the climb, use of prophylactic acetazolamide (a drug with diuretic properties that inhibits fluid retention), or acclimatization to increased altitude prior to the climb on the risk of AMS.

Ms. Navratilova was a powerful, fit, and dominant player throughout her professional career, and this incidence of altitude sickness in an athlete of her stature shows that "good fitness at sea level does not ensure protection from high altitude illnesses," says John B. West, MD, PhD, Editor-in-Chief of High Altitude Medicine & Biology and Professor of Medicine at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.

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High Altitude Medicine & Biology, the Official Journal of the International Society for Mountain Medicine (www.ismmed.org), is an authoritative, peer-reviewed journal published quarterly online. It is the only peer-reviewed journal dedicated exclusively to the latest advances in high altitude life sciences. The Journal presents findings on the effects of chronic hypoxia on lung and heart disease, pulmonary and cerebral edema, hypertension, dehydration, infertility, appetite and weight loss, and other diseases. A complete table of contents and full text for this issue may be viewed online at www.liebertpub.com/ham

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Journal of Aerosol Medicine and Pulmonary Drug Delivery, and Pediatric Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology. Its biotechnology trade magazine, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (GEN), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 60 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available at www.liebertpub.com



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