[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 15-Dec-2010
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Contact: Jim Gilden
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SAGE Publications

Concussed high school athletes who receive neuropsychological testing sidelined longer

Los Angeles, CA (December 15, 2010) When computerized neuropsychological testing is used, high school athletes suffering from a sports-related concussion are less likely to be returned to play within one week of their injury, according to a study in The American Journal of Sports Medicine (published by SAGE). Unfortunately, concussed football players are less likely to have computerized neuropsychological testing than those participating in other sports.

A total of 544 concussions were recorded by the High School Reporting Information Online surveillance system during the 2008-2009 school year. Researchers looked at each of those instances to see what caused the injury, what sport was being played, what symptoms were experienced, what type of testing was used, and how soon the athletes returned to play. When looking at the causes and duration of concussions, the research found that:

Computerized neuropsychological testing was used in 25.7% of concussions, and in those cases, athletes were less likely to return to play within one week, than those athletes for whom it was not used. Interestingly, however, researchers found that injured football players were less likely to be examined using the computerized neuropsychological testing than injured athletes participating in other sports.

"Although it is now recognized as one of 'the cornerstones of concussion evaluation,' routine neuropsychological testing in the setting of sports-related concussion is a relatively new concept," write the authors, William P. Meehan III, MD, Pierre d'Hemecourt, MD, and R. Dawn Comstock, PhD. "This is the first study, of which we are aware, to query the use of computerized neuropsychological testing in high school athletes using a large, nationally representative sample."

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"High School Concussions in the 2008-2009 Academic Year: Mechanism, Symptoms, and Management" in the December 2010 issue of The American Journal of Sports Medicine is available free for a limited time at http://ajs.sagepub.com/content/38/12/2405.full.

The American Journal of Sports Medicine is a peer-reviewed scientific journal for the orthopedic sports medicine community. First published in 1972. it is the official publication of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM), and is now ranked 2nd in both Orthopedics and Sports Sciences in Thomson Reuters 2008 Journal Citation ReportsŪ, with an Impact Factor of 3.646. The journal is a forum for independent orthopedic sports medicine research and education, helping clinical practitioners to make decisions based on sound scientific information.

SAGE Publications is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets. Since 1965, SAGE has helped inform and educate a global community of scholars, practitioners, researchers, and students spanning a wide range of subject areas including business, humanities, social sciences, and science, technology, and medicine. An independent company, SAGE has principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore and Washington DC.

Members of the media qualify for free access to this and 560+ other SAGE journals. Contact Jim Gilden (jim.gilden@sagepub.com) for further information.



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