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Contact: Laura Fabri
l.fabri@elsevier.com
39-028-818-4353
Elsevier

The changing roles of 2 hemispheres in stroke recovery

Recovery from aphasia is a dynamic, ongoing process

Milan, Italy, 31 January 2010 Most people who survive a stroke recover some degree of their motor, sensory and cognitive functions over the following months and years. This recovery is commonly believed to reflect a reorganisation of the central nervous system that occurs after brain damage. Now a new study, published in the February 2011 issue of Elsevier's Cortex, sheds further light on the recovery process through its effect on language skills.

For almost all right-handed people and for about 60% of left-handers, damage to the left side of the brain causes a condition known as aphasia, an acute or chronic impairment of language skills. The syndrome is strongly associated with damage to the left hemisphere of the brain; however, there is a long-standing controversy regarding the involvement of parts of the right hemisphere in language functions and their contribution to recovery from aphasia. The majority of experts stress the role of the dominant left side in language recovery, while others argue for a complementary (or compensatory) function of the right hemisphere.

Odelia Elkana, from the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, and colleagues investigated the systematic patterns of reorganisation in the brain's language functions, and their relation to linguistic performance, in patients recovering from childhood brain damage to the left hemisphere. They used functional MRI to detect patterns of brain activity while patients performed various linguistic tasks inside the scanner. The new study focused on a rare group of children whose brain damage had occurred after they had already developed language skills but while the brain was still developing, and therefore most able to reorganise its language functions.

According to the authors, the findings suggest that "recovery is a dynamic, ongoing process, may last for years after onset and is reflected in an increasing proficiency of inter-hemispheric coordination, rather than just in an increase of activation in one side or the other. Therefore, the role of each hemisphere in the recovery process is not only dependent on the stage of recovery (acute, sub-acute or chronic stage), but also within each of these stages it may continuously change over time."

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Notes to Editors:

The article is "Cerebral reorganization as a function of linguistic recovery in children: An fMRI study" by Odelia Elkana, Ram Frost, Uri Kramer, Dafna Ben-Bashat, Talma Hendler, David Schmidt, and Avraham Schweiger, and appears in Cortex, Volume 47, Issue 2 (February 2010), published by Elsevier in Italy. Full text of the article featured above is available to members of the media upon request. Please contact the Elsevier press office, newsroom@elsevier.com. To schedule an interview, contact Dr Odelia Elkana, odelia.elkana@gmail.com.

About Cortex

Cortex is an international journal devoted to the study of cognition and of the relationship between the nervous system and mental processes, particularly as these are reflected in the behaviour of patients with acquired brain lesions, normal volunteers, children with typical and atypical development, and in the activation of brain regions and systems as recorded by functional neuroimaging techniques. It was founded in 1964 by Ennio De Renzi. The Editor in-chief of Cortex is Sergio Della Sala, Professor of Human Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Edinburgh. Fax: 0131 6513230, e-mail: cortex@ed.ac.uk. Cortex is available online at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/00109452

About Elsevier

Elsevier is a world-leading publisher of scientific, technical and medical information products and services. The company works in partnership with the global science and health communities to publish more than 2,000 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and close to 20,000 book titles, including major reference works from Mosby and Saunders. Elsevier's online solutions include SciVerse ScienceDirect, SciVerse Scopus, Reaxys, MD Consult and Nursing Consult, which enhance the productivity of science and health professionals, and the SciVal suite and MEDai's Pinpoint Review, which help research and health care institutions deliver better outcomes more cost-effectively.

A global business headquartered in Amsterdam, Elsevier employs 7,000 people worldwide. The company is part of Reed Elsevier Group PLC, a world-leading publisher and information provider, which is jointly owned by Reed Elsevier PLC and Reed Elsevier NV. The ticker symbols are REN (Euronext Amsterdam), REL (London Stock Exchange), RUK and ENL (New York Stock Exchange).



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