Public Release:  Nearly 1 in 4 postmenopausal women with fractures is obese

Although less likely to suffer a hip or wrist fracture, obese women suffer from fragility fractures at other sites, partly due to poor mobility and increased risk of falls

International Osteoporosis Foundation

Obesity is widely believed to be protective against fracture, although a recent study has documented a high prevalence of obesity in postmenopausal women with fragility fracture.

An international group of researchers has today presented research at the European Congress on Osteoporosis & Osteoarthritis (ECCEO11-IOF) that compares the prevalence and location of fractures in obese (BMI≥30 kg/m2) and non-obese postmenopausal women and examines specific risk factors for fracture.

A history of fracture after age 45 years was observed in 23% of obese and 24% of non-obese women. Nearly one in four postmenopausal women with fractures is obese. The upper arm, ankle and lower leg were significantly more likely to be affected in obese than non-obese women with a prevalent fracture, whereas fractures of the wrist, hip and pelvis were significantly less common than in non-obese women. When compared to non-obese women, obese women with a prevalent fracture were more likely to be current cortisone users, to report early menopause, to report fair or poor general health, to use arms to assist standing from a sitting position, and to report more than two falls in the past year.

The research demonstrates that obese postmenopausal women are almost as likely to fracture as non-obese women, and that poor mobility and increased risk of falls may play an important role. The findings have significant public health implications in view of the rapidly rising numbers of obese people in the population.

###

Abstract OC21: Fractures in obese postmenopausal women: prevalence, skeletal location and risk factors. J. Compston et al. Osteoporosis International DOI 10.1007/s00198-011-1554-9

ABOUT IOF

The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) is a nongovernmental umbrella organization dedicated to the worldwide fight against osteoporosis, the disease known as "the silent epidemic". IOF's members - committees of scientific researchers, patient, medical and research societies and industry representatives from around the world - share a common vision of a world without osteoporotic fractures. IOF now represents 196 societies in 92 locations. http://www.iofbonehealth.org

ABOUT ESCEO

The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) is a non-profit organization, dedicated to a close interaction between clinical scientists dealing with rheumatic disorders, pharmaceutical industry developing new compounds in this field, regulators responsible for the registration of such drugs and health policy makers, to integrate the management of osteoporosis and osteoarthritis within the comprehensive perspective of health resources utilization. The objective of ESCEO is to provide practitioners with the latest clinical and economic information, allowing them to organize their daily practice, in an evidence-based medicine perspective, with a cost-conscious perception. http://www.esceo.org

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.