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Public Library of Science

Proteins may affect behavior and physiology of female mosquitoes -- from PLoS NTDs

Proteins could be used to develop new approaches for regulating mosquito reproduction, feeding, and behavior

Researchers have identified 93 seminal fluid proteins and 52 sperm male-derived proteins that include candidates likely to affect the behavior and physiology of female mosquitoes of the species, Aedes aegypti. The results of this research, conducted by Laura Sirot (now at the College of Wooster) and fellow researchers in the labs of Laura Harrington and Mariana Wolfner at Cornell University and José Ribeiro at the National Institutes of Health, will be published on March 15th in the open-access journal PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

Building on previous research which indicated that the act of mating alters the reproductive behavior of female mosquitoes in areas such as egg production, feeding patterns, and receptivity to mating, these researchers are hoping to measure the effect of these proteins to see how eliminating them might alter the behavior of the blood-sucking female (males don't bite). The study was conducted on yellow fever mosquitoes, which carry that virus as well as dengue (den-GAY) fever virus, which causes a potentially lethal infection that affects millions of humans annually. These mosquitoes are also related to the Asian Tiger Mosquito, which can transmit West Nile virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis (swelling of the brain) — both potentially life-threatening illnesses.

"What we have been able to do is identify the proteins that males transfer to the female," says Sirot, "and by distinguishing between male-derived and female-derived proteins within the female reproductive tract, we can begin to determine which male-derived proteins affect the behavior and physiology of the females, and how they do it." Some proteins are of particular interest because of their potential roles in modulating sperm fertilizing ability, as well as the role they might play in the synthesis of hormones and activating or deactivating other proteins. What this means, according to Sirot, is that scientists might be able to use these proteins to develop new approaches for regulating female reproduction, blood feeding, and mating behavior.

These approaches to mosquito control could be an alternative to the use of pesticides. Sirot and her fellow researchers are developing approaches which could provide a foundation for innovative new control strategies, such as reducing egg production and curbing the female's appetite for blood, which will ultimately reduce the spread of these life-threatening illnesses.

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FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE: This work was funded in part by grant 5R21AI0176828 from National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, and by NYC-139437 HATCH project to LCH and MFW. LKS was supported in part by a National Institutes of Health National Research Service Award fellowship F32GM074361. JMCR was supported by the Intramural Research Program of the Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

COMPETING INTERESTS: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

CONTACT:

Dr. Laura Sirot
The College of Wooster
lsirot@wooster.edu
(330) 263-2341

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About PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases

PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases(http://www.plosntds.org/) is a peer-reviewed, open-access journal devoted to the pathology, epidemiology, prevention, treatment, and control of the neglected tropical diseases, as well as public policy relevant to this group of diseases. All works published in PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases are open access, which means that everything is immediately and freely available subject only to the condition that the original authorship and source are properly attributed. The Public Library of Science uses the Creative Commons Attribution License, and copyright is retained by the authors.

About the Public Library of Science

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