Public Release:  2 tests better than 1 to diagnose diabetes in overweight children

More than two-thirds of high-risk patients missed if recommended hemoglobin A1C test used alone

GolinHarris NY

Kansas City, MO - May 2, 2011 - A new study found that the recommended blood test may not be enough to catch type 2 diabetes in overweight children, missing more than two-thirds of children at high-risk for the condition. Researchers from Children's Mercy Hospital and Clinics found that performing two tests - both the recommended hemoglobin A1C test and an oral glucose tolerance test - could dramatically reduce the risk of delayed diagnosis in overweight children. The findings were presented Saturday at the Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting in Denver.

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) revised clinical practice recommendations for type 2 diabetes screening in 2010 in an effort to encourage more screening and earlier diagnosis. While the oral glucose tolerance test was previously considered the gold standard for diabetes screening, diagnosis using hemoglobin A1C does not require a long fast beforehand, making it easier for patients.

"Our research indicates that special consideration may need to be given to overweight children being tested for diabetes," said lead researcher Ghufran S. Babar, MD, a pediatric endocrinologist at Children's Mercy. "Simply following the guidelines may not be enough to ensure these children get proper care."

The study evaluated the charts of 629 overweight and adolescent patients who had both tests. According to the findings, 40 percent of type 2 diabetes patients and 67 percent of high-risk patients identified through the oral glucose tolerance test would have shown a normal glycemic status if only the hemoglobin A1C test were used to diagnose them. Nearly nine out of ten patients (86 percent) had normal blood glucose levels according to their hemoglobin A1C results.

"Lifestyle changes and early treatment can help delay disease progression of diabetes," said Wayne Moore, MD, PhD, chief and medical director of the endocrine/diabetes section at Children's Mercy. "It is important that patients are diagnosed as early as possible for the best outcomes."

Clinical investigators from Children's Mercy presented a total of 39 studies at the Pediatric Academic Societies meeting.

###

About Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics

Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, located in Kansas City, Mo., is one of the nation's top pediatric medical centers. The 314-bed hospital provides care for children from birth through the age of 18, and has been recognized by the American Nurses Credentialing Center with Magnet designation for excellence in nursing services, and ranked by U.S. News & World Report as one of "America's Best Children's Hospitals." Its faculty of 600 pediatricians and researchers across more than 40 subspecialties are actively involved in clinical care, pediatric research, and educating the next generation of pediatric subspecialists. For more information about Children's Mercy and its research, visit childrensmercy.org or download our mobile phone app CMH4YOU for all phone types. For breaking news and videos, follow us on Twitter, YouTube and Facebook.

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.