[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 9-May-2011
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Contact: Ashley Wrye
media.inquiries@sagepub.com
SAGE Publications

High rates of unemployment does not decrease insurgent attacks against government, allied forces

Los Angeles, CA (APRIL XX, 2011) Despite contrary belief, reducing unemployment in locations with active insurgencies does not decrease the rate of insurgent attacks against government and allied forces. Additionally, it was found that unemployment in these same locations also had no impact in reducing the deaths of civilians.

A new study released in the recent issue of the Journal of Conflict Resolution (published by SAGE) found that there is no correlation that aiding countries with high rates of unemployed young men leads to a decrease in political violence. Additionally, the study found there is no significant relationship between unemployment and the rate of insurgent attacks that kill civilians.

"The vast majority of aid money spent to reduce political violence is motivated by an opportunity-cost theory of distracting recruits," wrote the researchers. "(however) the data emphatically reject a positive correlation between unemployment and attacks against government and allied forces."

The authors test that prediction in Afghanistan, Iraq, and the Philippines, using survey data on unemployment and two newly available measures of insurgency: (1) attacks against government and allied forces and (2) violence that kill civilians. Despite the great differences in geography, nature and intensity of insurgencies, the results from all three countries was remarkably similar.

In light of recent worldwide events, "a better understanding of how, when, and where aid spending helps reduce political violence will both further our understanding of insurgencies, while helping to guide practitioners in applying limited development aid in conflict and post-conflict societies."

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The article entitled "Do Working Men Rebel? Insurgency and Unemployment in Afghanistan, Iraq, and the Philippines from the Journal of Conflict Resolution is available free for a limited time at: http://jcr.sagepub.com/content/early/2011/03/16/0022002710393920.full.pdf+html.

For more than fifty years, The Journal of Conflict Resolution (JCR) has provided scholars and researchers with the latest studies and theories on the causes of and solutions to the full range of human conflict. JCR focuses on international conflict, but also explores a variety of national, intergroup and interpersonal conflicts that may help in understanding problems of war and peace. JCR can be accessed at http://jcr.sagepub.com/

SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets. Since 1965, SAGE has helped inform and educate a global community of scholars, practitioners, researchers, and students spanning a wide range of subject areas including business, humanities, social sciences, and science, technology, and medicine. An independent company, SAGE has principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore and Washington DC. www.sagepublications.com



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