[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 20-Jun-2011
[ | E-mail Share Share ]

Contact: Megan Sever
msever@earthmagazine.org
American Geological Institute

EARTH: Endangered snow: How climate change threatens west coast water supplies

Alexandria, VA From Seattle to Los Angeles, anywhere from 50 to 80 percent of the water people use comes from mountain snow. Snow falls in the mountains in the winter, where it's stored as snowpack until spring and summer when it flows down the mountains into reservoirs. It's a clean, reliable source of water. But soon, it may become less dependable, thanks to climate change.

In the July feature "Endangered Snow: How climate change threatens West Coast water supplies," EARTH Magazine looks at how climate change could disrupt the balance of water and snow in the mountains, and what that might mean for your water supplies.

Read how scientists, water managers and utilities are working together to assess how water availability across the West may change as the climate changes, and how to adapt to such changes. Plus, read other stories on topics such as the new strategy creationists are employing to interject their beliefs into mainstream geology, how new ceramic coatings may protect airplane engines from volcanic ash, and why disasters such as the Japan earthquake and tsunami affect the economies of rich or poor countries disproportionately in the July issue. And don't miss the hard-hitting review of Stephen Schneider's last book, "Science as a Contact Sport."

###

These stories and many more can be found in the July issue of EARTH, now available digitally (http://www.earthmagazine.org/digital/) or in print on your local newsstands.

For further information on the July featured article, go to http://www.earthmagazine.org/earth/article/458-7db-6-11 .

Keep up to date with the latest happenings in earth, energy and environment news with EARTH magazine, available on local newsstands or online at http://www.earthmagazine.org/. Published by the American Geological Institute, EARTH is your source for the science behind the headlines.



[ Back to EurekAlert! ] [ | E-mail Share Share ]

 


AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.