[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
23-Jun-2011

[ | E-mail ] Share Share

Contact: Anne DeLotto Baier
abaier@health.usf.edu
813-974-3300
University of South Florida (USF Health)

Community health worker interventions improve rates of US mammography screening

New study shows certain setttings and racial-ethnic parity strengthen beneficial effect

IMAGE: The study's lead author was Kristen Wells, Ph.D., assistant professor at the University of South Florida Center for Evidence-Based Medicine and Health Outcomes Research.

Click here for more information.

Tampa, FL (June 23, 2011) - Education, referrals, support and other interventions by community health workers improve rates of screening mammography in the United States - especially in medical and urban settings and among women whose race and ethnicity is similar to that of the community health workers serving them.

Researchers at the University of South Florida, Moffitt Cancer Center, and Georgia Southern University reported these findings earlier this month in an online first issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. Their systematic review and analysis of a wide range of original studies evaluating community health worker programs offers a clearer, more powerful picture of the effectiveness of CHWs than the single studies alone - some which found no improvement in mammography screening.

Community health workers (CHW) are lay people trained to serve as a bridge between people in their communities and health care providers and services. CHWs have traditionally served people who lack access to adequate health care and are at highest risk for poor outcomes. These liaisons have often been used to promote screenings for breast cancer, a disease with significant racial and socioeconomic disparities in mortality, survival rates and cancer stage at diagnosis.

"Our systematic study points to the fact that community health workers play an important role in helping medically underserved women obtain screening mammograms," said lead author Kristen Wells, PhD, MPH, assistant professor at the USF Center for Evidence-Based Medicine and Health Outcomes Research. "Future studies need to focus on what factors really drive the success of the interventions. What makes a strong community health worker program that best helps the most people?"

The researchers systematically reviewed 24 studies (randomized controlled trials, case-controlled studies and quasi-experimental studies) investigating the effectiveness of CHW programs specifically designed to increase screening mammography in women age 40 or older without a history of breast cancer. These programs were conducted in the United States in community health clinics or other settings outside a hospital. Eighteen studies enrolled a total of 26,660 participants and provided enough data to do further analysis.

Overall, the analysis found that interventions by CHWs are associated with a significant increase in rates of screening mammography. The study also teased out from the randomized controlled trials some new findings about when and where CHW programs are most likely to benefit:

###

The work was supported by grants from the National Cancer Institute, including its Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities.

Article citation:

"Do Community Health Worker Interventions Improve Rates of Screening Mammography in the United States? A Systematic Review;" Kristen J. Wells, John S. Luque, Branko Miladinovic, Natalia Vargas, Yasmin Asvat, Richard G. Roetzheim, and Ambuj Kumar; Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention; Published Online First June 8, 2011; doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-11-0276.

USF Health is dedicated to creating a model of health care based on understanding the full spectrum of health. It includes the University of South Florida's colleges of Medicine, Nursing, Public Health and Pharmacy, the School of Biomedical Sciences and the School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Sciences; and the USF Physician's Group. Ranked 34th in federal research expenditures for public universities by the National Science Foundation, the University of South Florida is a high impact global research university.



[ Back to EurekAlert! ] [ | E-mail Share Share ]

 


AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.