Public Release:  Trudeau Institute announces new discovery in battle against infections

Researchers have identified a previously unknown link between the migration of white blood cells to infected tissues and immune memory

Trudeau Institute

Saranac Lake, N.Y. - Researchers from Dr. Woodland's lab at the Trudeau Institute have now identified a previously unknown link between the migration of white blood cells to infected tissues and the ability of these cells to survive and become long-lived memory cells after the infection has been cleared. The new data is featured on the cover of this month's The Journal of Experimental Medicine.

"Defining the factors that regulate the generation of these long-lived memory cells is crucial, as these are the cells that provide protection from re-infection," said Dr. David Woodland. "Our study focuses on influenza and tuberculosis infections, but a similar study from our colleagues in Japan that was published simultaneously in The Journal of Experimental Medicine shows this observation is relevant to other pathogens, suggesting these findings may be applicable to many infectious diseases. Hopefully, we can use this information to design vaccines that generate larger numbers of memory cells and can therefore provide better protective immunity."

The lab envisions the findings will lead to the development of additives that act to boost vaccine efficacy. This would be especially important for the elderly population that tends to be difficult to effectively vaccinate.

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Dr. Woodland's studies are funded by the Trudeau Institute and grants from the National Institutes of Health.

About Trudeau Institute

The Trudeau Institute is an independent, not-for-profit, biomedical research organization, whose scientific mission is to make breakthrough discoveries leading to improved human health. Trudeau researchers are identifying the basic mechanisms used by the immune system to combat viruses like influenza, mycobacteria, such as tuberculosis, parasites and cancer, so that better vaccines and therapies can be developed for fighting deadly disease.

The research is supported by government grants and philanthropic contributions.

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