[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 24-Oct-2011
[ | E-mail Share Share ]

Contact: Shari Leventhal
sleventhal@asn-online.org
202-640-1394
American Society of Nephrology

Take your blood pressure meds before bed

Taking the drugs at night controls blood pressure better and reduces risk of heart problems

Washington, DC (Monday, October 24, 2011) — It's better to take blood pressure-lowering medications before bed rather than first thing in the morning, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society Nephrology (JASN). The results indicate that heart conditions such as strokes and heart attacks can be drastically reduced in patients with hypertension with no extra effort or cost.

The time of day when patients take blood pressure-lowering medications can affect their blood pressure patterns, but does it make any difference to their health? Ramón Hermida, PhD (University of Vigo, in Spain) and his colleagues studied this question in a group of 661 patients who had chronic kidney disease and hypertension. Half of the patients took all prescribed blood pressure-lowering medications first thing in the morning and half took at least one of them at bedtime.

After an average follow-up of 5.4 years, patients who took at least one blood pressure-lowering medication at bedtime had better control of their blood pressure and were about one-third as likely to experience a heart-related event such as a heart attack, a stroke, or heart failure compared to patients who took their medications upon awakening. Also, sleep-time blood pressure was a much more accurate measure of heart health than wake-time blood pressure.

"Our results indicate that cardiovascular event rates in patients with hypertension can be reduced by more than 50% with a zero-cost strategy of administering blood pressure-lowering medications at bedtime rather than in the morning," said Dr. Hermida. "This study also documents for the first time that sleep-time blood pressure is the most relevant independent marker of cardiovascular risk," he added.

###

Study co-authors include Diana Ayala, MD, PhD, Artemio Mojón, PhD, José Fernández, PhD (University of Vigo, in Spain.)

Disclosures: The authors reported no financial disclosures.

The article, entitled "Bedtime Dosing of Antihypertensive Medications Reduces Cardiovascular Risk in CKD," will appear online at http://jasn.asnjournals.org/ on Monday, October 24, 2011, doi:10.1681/ASN.2011040361.

The content of this article does not reflect the views or opinions of The American Society of Nephrology (ASN). Responsibility for the information and views expressed therein lies entirely with the author(s). ASN does not offer medical advice. All content in ASN publications is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions, or adverse effects. This content should not be used during a medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Please consult your doctor or other qualified health care provider if you have any questions about a medical condition, or before taking any drug, changing your diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment. Do not ignore or delay obtaining professional medical advice because of information accessed through ASN. Call 911 or your doctor for all medical emergencies.

Founded in 1966, and with more than 12,000 members, the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) leads the fight against kidney disease by educating health professionals, sharing new knowledge, advancing research, and advocating the highest quality care for patients.



[ Back to EurekAlert! ] [ | E-mail Share Share ]

 


AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.