Could not connect to DB: 1040: Too many connectionsCould not execute 'UPDATE pressrelease SET r_hits = r_hits+ 1, r_total_hits = r_total_hits+ 1, r_pub_hits = r_pub_hits+ 1, r_total_pub_hits = r_total_pub_hits+ 1 WHERE r_id = 197608' on database eurekalert:
2002: Can't connect to local MySQL server through socket '/tmp/mysql.sock' (2) [ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 31-Oct-2011
[ | E-mail Share Share ]

Contact: Craig Andrews
craig.andrews@nyumc.org
212-404-3511
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Neurologists identify potential biomarker of cognitive decline for earlier diagnosis of disease

Research show relationship between changes in discreet area of the brain and cognitive ability

Researchers from the Department of Neurology at NYU Langone Medical Center identified for the first time that changes in the tissue located at the junction between the outer and inner layers of the brain, called "blurring", may be an important, non-invasive biomarker for earlier diagnosis and the development of new therapies for degenerative brain conditions, such as multiple sclerosis. The study was published in the Oct. 26th issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.

"The findings are significant because this is the first time we have mapped the distinct relationship between blurring of the boundary in the left hemisphere, where verbal language skills are managed, and the impact that changes in this area have on cognitive ability," said Karen Blackmon, PhD, research assistant professor, Department of Neurology and lead author of the study. "The fact that this occurs in healthy brains and appears to be connected with a person's cognitive function has significant implications for our ability to diagnose brain disease earlier and for the potential development of new therapies."

In the study, 32 healthy adults had an MRI scan of their brain. The images were enhanced to highlight the junction between the area of the brain where neurons control cognitive and motor function, or "grey matter", and the area where longer, myelin-insulated axon cells responsible for efficient transmission of electrical signals, or "white matter", exist. When neurons develop incorrectly among the axons (which can happen in-utero or after a brain injury) they are visible as "blurring" along the edge of this junction on an MRI. Blurring is associated with impaired cognitive conditions, such as epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease, but has never been identified in individuals without these conditions.

The researchers administered standardized intelligence tests and scored the participants verbal, visual, and spatial cognitive abilities. These abilities are controlled by a distinct area in the brain's left hemisphere and are an established measure of overall cognitive function.

The researchers found that not only did blurring exist in brains without a degenerative condition, but when the verbal language assessment scores were linked with the MRI data, there was a strong relationship between the amount of blurring and a decreasing level of verbal language skill. For more information about the Department of Neurology at NYU Langone Medical Center go to http://www.med.nyu.edu/neurology.

###

About NYU Langone Medical Center

NYU Langone Medical Center, a world-class, patient-centered, integrated, academic medical center, is one on the nation's premier centers for excellence in clinical care, biomedical research and medical education. Located in the heart of Manhattan, NYU Langone is composed of three hospitals Tisch Hospital, its flagship acute care facility; the Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, the world's first university-affiliated facility devoted entirely to rehabilitation medicine; and the Hospital for Joint Diseases, one of only five hospitals in the nation dedicated to orthopaedics and rheumatology plus the NYU School of Medicine, which since 1841 has trained thousand of physicians and scientists who have helped to shape the course of medical history. The medical center's tri-fold mission to serve, teach and discover is achieved 365 days a year through the seamless integration of a culture devoted to excellence in patient care, education and research. For more information, go to http://www.NYULMC.org.



[ Back to EurekAlert! ] [ | E-mail Share Share ]

 


AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.