Public Release:  Diabetes susceptibility gene identified: Tomosyn-2 regulates insulin secretion

PLOS

A group of researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison has pinpointed a gene that confers diabetes susceptibility in obese mice. Published on October 6th in the open-access journal PLoS Genetics, this study also shows that its protein tomosyn-2 acts as a brake on insulin secretion from the pancreas.

"It's too early for us to know how relevant this gene will be to human diabetes," says Alan Attie, who leads the group, "but the concept of negative regulation is one of the most interesting things to come out of this study and that very likely applies to humans."

In a properly tuned system, insulin secreted into the blood after eating helps maintain blood sugar at a safe level. Too little insulin (as in type 1 diabetes) or insulin resistance (as in type 2 diabetes) leads to high blood sugar and diabetic symptoms. Too much insulin can drive blood glucose dangerously low and lead to coma or even death. The group found tomosyn-2 while searching for genes that contribute to diabetes susceptibility in obese mice. Genetic analyses and comparisons of obese diabetes-resistant and diabetes-susceptible mouse strains revealed a single amino acid difference that destabilizes the tomosyn-2 protein in the diabetes-resistant mice, effectively releasing the brake on insulin secretion and allowing those animals to release enough insulin to avoid diabetes.

Though diabetes is highly unlikely to be caused by a single gene, identifying important biological pathways can suggest clinically useful targets. "This study shows the power of genetics to discover new mechanisms for a complex disease like type 2 diabetes," concludes Sushant Bhatnagar, a co-lead author of the paper.

###

FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE: This work was supported by NIDDK grants DK66369 and 58037. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

COMPETING INTERESTS: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

CITATION: Bhatnagar S, Oler AT, Rabaglia ME, Stapleton DS, Schueler KL, et al. (2011) Positional Cloning of a Type 2 Diabetes Quantitative Trait Locus; Tomosyn-2, a Negative Regulator of Insulin Secretion. PLoS Genet 7(10): e1002323. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1002323

CONTACT: Alan Attie
543A Biochemistry Addition
Department of Biochemistry
433 Babcock Drive
Madison, WI 53706-1544
USA
(608) 262-1372
adattie@wisc.edu

Disclaimer

This press release refers to an upcoming article in PLoS Genetics. The release is provided by journal staff, or by the article authors and/or their institutions. Any opinions expressed in this release or article are the personal views of the journal staff and/or article contributors, and do not necessarily represent the views or policies of PLoS. PLoS expressly disclaims any and all warranties and liability in connection with the information found in the releases and articles and your use of such information.

About PLoS Genetics

PLoS Genetics (http://www.plosgenetics.org) reflects the full breadth and interdisciplinary nature of genetics and genomics research by publishing outstanding original contributions in all areas of biology. All works published in PLoS Genetics are open access. Everything is immediately and freely available online throughout the world subject only to the condition that the original authorship and source are properly attributed. Copyright is retained by the authors. The Public Library of Science uses the Creative Commons Attribution License.

About the Public Library of Science

The Public Library of Science (PLoS) is a non-profit organization of scientists and physicians committed to making the world's scientific and medical literature a freely available public resource. For more information, visit http://www.plos.org.

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.