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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
12-Oct-2011

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Contact: Yael Franco
yfranco@plos.org
415-568-3169
PLOS

Testing protein leverage in lean humans: a randomised controlled experimental study

Press release from PLoS ONE

Proper protein intake crucial for moderating energy intake, keeping obesity at bay

Obesity is a growing problem worldwide, but proper protein consumption can help keep it at bay, according to a paper published Oct. 12 in the online journal PLoS ONE. The researchers found that, when subjects were fed a 10% protein diet, they consumed 12% more energy over four days than they did on a 15% protein diet. Moreover, 70% of the increased energy intake on the lower protein diet was attributed to snacking. When the protein content was further increased to 25%, however, the researchers observed no change in behavior relative to the 15% protein diet.

It had previously been suggested that protein content plays an important role in determining overall energy intake, and thus affects obesity, but until this study, experimental verification had been lacking. To test the hypothesis, the researchers tested 16 female and 6 male participants, all lean and in good health. The subjects spent four days on each of the three diets, which were made as similar as possible in factors such as palatability, availability, variety, and appearance, and their intake was monitored.

According to Dr. Alison Gosby, "the results show that humans have a particularly strong appetite for protein, and when the proportion of protein in the diet is low this appetite can drive excess energy intake. Our findings have considerable implications for bodyweight management in the current nutritional environment, where foods rich in fat and carbohydrate are cheap, palatable and available to an extent unprecedented in our history."

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This work was led by Dr. Alison Gosby and Professor Stephen Simpson of the University of Sydney, Australia.

Citation: Gosby AK, Conigrave AD, Lau NS, Iglesias MA, Hall RM, et al. (2011) Testing Protein Leverage in Lean Humans: A Randomised Controlled Experimental Study. PLoS ONE 6(10): e25929. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0025929

Financial Disclosure: This work was entirely funded by an Australian National Health and Medical Research Council project grant (no. 457522). DR is partly funded by the National Research Centre for Growth and Development. SJS is funded by an Australian Research Council Laureate Fellowship. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Competing Interest Statement: SAJ receives a fee from the Rosemary Conley Diet and Fitness Company for nutrition-related articles and lectures. This does not alter the authors adherence to all the PLoS ONE policies on sharing data and materials. The authors have declared that no other competing interests exist.

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About PLoS ONE: PLoS ONE is the first journal of primary research from all areas of science to employ a combination of peer review and post-publication rating and commenting, to maximize the impact of every report it publishes. PLoS ONE is published by the Public Library of Science (PLoS), the open-access publisher whose goal is to make the world's scientific and medical literature a public resource.

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