[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 7-Nov-2011
[ | E-mail Share Share ]

Contact: Traci Tournoux
ttournoux@healthstarpr.com
646-722-8830
HealthStar PR

Landmark survey reveals that most women who are done having children do not discuss their options with their OB/GYNs

Women don't know about non-surgical permanent birth control, including the Essure procedure which is celebrating its 10 year anniversary at the AAGL 40th Global Congress of Minimally Invasive Gynecology

Hollywood, FL, Nov. 7, 2011 – A recent first-of-its-kind survey of 1,006 mothers in the U.S. showed that more than 75 percent of women reported being done having children, but only 24 percent discussed this decision with their OB/GYNs. Without these important patient-physician conversations taking place, the survey found that women remain largely unaware of their permanent birth control options. In particular, the survey showed low awareness for non-surgical permanent birth control methods like the Essure procedure, which has been available in the U.S. since 2002 and is the most effective form of permanent birth control available.*

"I was surprised that so many women who report being done having children are not talking to their healthcare providers about their decision," said Dr. Linda Bradley, President of AAGL and a practicing OB/GYN. "Permanent birth control can be an ideal solution for couples who are content with their families and want to avoid future unplanned pregnancies. However, most women are unaware of permanent options that do not require surgery, revealing a huge opportunity for us, as physicians, to educate our patients."

Patients Don't Know About the Non-Surgical Permanent Birth Control Methods

Nearly 90 percent of women surveyed knew about vasectomy and tubal ligation, as these are typically the first options most couples consider when they are done having children. However, only 12 percent were aware of non-surgical, minimally invasive solutions such as Essure.

"Although non-surgical permanent birth control for women has been available for nearly a decade, I often find female patients are surprised to learn that they don't have to get a tubal ligation or ask their husbands to go for a vasectomy," said Dr. Bradley. "The Essure non-surgical permanent birth control procedure offers women the option of no incisions, no hormones, no general anesthesia and no slowing down to recover."

Women Want Effectiveness, But They're Sticking with the Familiar

Though women surveyed said that effectiveness was one of the most important factors when considering permanent birth control, many women who are done having children are continuing to rely on less effective methods like condoms, which have a 15 percent commercial failure rate,1 or the Pill, which has an 8 percent commercial failure rate.1

In comparison, a 10-year global study being released at the AAGL meeting explores the data of the commercial use of Essure by approximately 500,000 women and tracks closely with Essure's clinical effectiveness rate of 99.8 percent.*

About the Survey and Methodology

The online survey was conducted by Harris Interactive among 1,006 women age 28-48 who have at least one child and are married or in a committed relationship. Respondents for this survey were selected from among those who have agreed to participate in Harris Interactive surveys. Because the sample is based on those who have agreed to participate in the Harris Interactive online research panel, no estimates of theoretical sampling error can be calculated. Online interviews took place between August 30 and September 6, 2011. Results were weighted for race/ethnicity, education, household income, region and employment status. This survey was commissioned by HealthyWomen and supported by an educational grant from Conceptus, Inc.

###

About the Essure® Procedure

The Essure procedure, FDA approved since 2002, is the first permanent birth control method that can be performed in the comfort of a physician's office in less than 10 minutes (average hysteroscopic time) without hormones, cutting, burning or the risks associated with general anesthesia or tubal ligation. Soft, flexible inserts are placed in a woman's fallopian tubes through the cervix without incisions. Over the next three months, the body forms a natural barrier around and through the inserts to prevent sperm from reaching the egg. Three months after the Essure procedure, a doctor is able to perform an Essure Confirmation Test to confirm that the inserts are properly placed and that the fallopian tubes are fully blocked, allowing the patient to rely upon Essure for permanent birth control.

The Essure procedure is covered by most insurance plans, and when it is performed in a doctor's office the cost to the patient may be as low as a simple co-pay.

About Conceptus, Inc.

Conceptus, Inc. is a leader in the design, development, and marketing of innovative solutions in women's healthcare. The company manufactures and markets the Essure procedure. The Essure procedure is available in the United States, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Mexico, Central and South America and the Middle East. The company also promotes the GYNECARE THERMACHOICE(R) Uterine Balloon Therapy System by ETHICON(TM) Women's Health & Urology, a division of Ethicon, Inc., in U.S. OB/GYN physician offices.

Please visit http://www.essure.com for more information on the Essure procedure. Patients may call the Essure Information Center at 1-877-ESSURE-1 with questions or to find a physician in their area.

© 2011 Conceptus, Inc. – All rights reserved. Conceptus, Essure, Your Family is Complete, Your Choice is Clear are registered trademarks and service marks of Conceptus, Inc. Essure FlexPay and Essurance Promise are trademarks of Conceptus, Inc. CC-2952 04Nov11F

*Based on 4 years of clinical data

1 Efficacy data based on one year of typical use adapted from Contraceptive Efficacy, by James Trussell PhD, in Contraceptive Technology: Nineteenth Revised Edition, New York NY: Ardent Media, 2007.



[ Back to EurekAlert! ] [ | E-mail Share Share ]

 


AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.