Public Release:  Nearly two-thirds of American osteoporotic hip fractures are seen in the extreme elderly

Threat of epidemic as this population increases

European League Against Rheumatism

Berlin, Germany, June 7 2012: A new American study presented today at EULAR 2012, the Annual Congress of the European League Against Rheumatism, calls for more aggressive management of osteoporosis in the extreme elderly as the true impact of osteoporotic hip fractures in those aged 80 years or older is unveiled.

Via the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS), 4.3 million patients over the age of 65 with osteoporotic hip fractures were studied. Results showed that 67.3% of hip fractures occurred in the extreme elderly, increasing from 172,209 in 1993 to 180,428 in 2008. This growth was despite the fact that hip fracture prevalence decreased from 2,236 to 1,600 per 1,000 person-years in the same period, but is coincident with the dramatic rise in the extreme elderly population, from 7.7 million in 1993 to 11.2 million in 2008.

In addition, in 2008, the extreme elderly made up 42.3% of the elderly population, but accounted for 69% of hospitalisations. "We know that hip fracture in the extreme elderly is a serious problem due to the associated consequences of hospitalisation, disability and mortality," commented Ms. Amrita Sehgal from University of California, USA and lead study author. "This data is cause for concern as the impact highlighted will only increase along with this population segment. The question now is how we manage the extreme elderly more effectively to limit the impact that osteoporotic fractures have going forward."

With the extreme elderly predicted to comprise 25% of the total US population by 2050, this study calls for more aggressive measures to be introduced to enable osteoporosis to be more effectively prevented, diagnosed and treated. The study recommends that this should be via traditional methods, e.g. medical professionals, or more holistically via non-traditional settings and providers, like assisted living facilities.

Abstract Number: OP0043

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NOTES TO EDITORS:

For further information on this study, or to request an interview with the study lead, please do not hesitate to contact the EULAR congress Press Office in Hall 6 on the 3rd floor of the Congress Centre during EULAR 2012 or on:

Email: eularpressoffice@cohnwolfe.com

Candice Debleu:
Onsite tel: +44 7894 386 425

About EULAR

  • The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) is the organisation which represents the patient, health professional and scientific societies of rheumatology of all the European nations
  • In line with The European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS), EULAR defines rheumatology as including rheumatic diseases of the connective tissue, locomotor and musculoskeletal systems
  • EULAR aims to promote, stimulate and support the research, prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of rheumatic diseases. With 45 scientific member societies, 36 PARE organisations and 10 health professionals associations, EULAR underscores the importance of combating rheumatic diseases not only by medical means, but also through a wider context of care for rheumatic patients and a thorough understanding of their social and other needs
  • Diseases of the bone and joints such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis cause disability in 4-5% of the adult population and are predicted to rise as people live longer
  • EULAR 2012 is set to be the biggest rheumatology event in Europe with over 15,000 scientists, physicians, allied health professionals, and related audiences in attendance from over 115 countries. Over the course of the congress, more than 275 oral and 1400 poster abstract presentations will be featured, with 1,010 invited speaker lectures taking place in 190 sessions
  • To find out more about the activities of EULAR, visit: www.eular.org

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